#LASA2015 Pop Quiz @CambriaPress Booth #7 – Your Chance to Win A Free Book!

#LASA2015 Cambria Press Latin American Studies LatAm
#LASA2015 Pop Quiz! Submit your answer at the Cambria Press booth (#7) and you could win a free book!

#LASA2015 Pop Quiz! Come to the Cambria Press booth (#7) in the book exhibit hall and submit your answer. You could win a free book of your choice!

Download this flyer for a 35% discount for you and your library. Offer ends on June 15.

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#LASA2015 Highlight: Interview with John Burns, author of Contemporary Hispanic Poets

#LASA2015 Highlight: Interview with John Burns, author of Contemporary Hispanic Poets Cambria Press Latin American Studies
#LASA2015 Highlight: Interview with John Burns, author of Contemporary Hispanic Poets

The following is an interview with John Burns, author of Contemporary Hispanic Poets: Cultural Production in the Global, Digital Age:

Question: Why did you decide to write Contemporary Hispanic Poets?
John Burns: I decided to write Contemporary Hispanic Poets because the need to emphasize the relationship between text and context is important when addressing poetry. This is particularly important for English-speaking readers, so as to avoid projecting certain assumptions about Latin American poetry onto texts that may produce meaning in surprisingly distinct ways from English-language contexts. I also hoped to highlight connections between Spanish-speaking literary traditions as well as between poetry and other forms of cultural production, from Internet culture to television and newspapers. Ezra Pound once wrote that “Literature does not exist in a vacuum.” This book attempts to dispel any perception of a vacuum. In order to do so I employed an interdisciplinary approach, using the tools of traditional literary studies as well as critical theory on globalization that focuses largely on political economics, mass media and regional history.

Question: What do you hope your readers take away from your book?
John Burns: I hope that readers appreciate the variety of work being produced in the Spanish-speaking world in numerous contexts and in numerous forms. There is a tendency for readers of poetry, or of literature in general, to exist in metaphorical silos. These may be silos of taste, silos of regional interest or silos of historical periods. I hope to undermine those silos. Although the book focuses on the end of the twentieth century, I situate the work in terms that readers of literature from other time periods can appreciate, highlighting the history that informs more contemporary texts. I move between poets who are highly distinct in terms of national tradition, style and artistic trajectory to illuminate some of their common underpinnings.
I also hope that readers come away with a sense of poetry as a human artifact that can be understood in broader cultural terms. In academia, there is an institutional bias that views poetry as inherently difficult, even as elitist. Rather than elitist, I view poetry as essential. It is embedded in the politics, cultural practices and social norms that inform daily life in different corners of the Spanish-speaking world.

Question: What other research do you believe is needed on this topic?
John Burns: I think there needs to continue to be work that takes into account the massive paradigm shifts the world has undergone in the last thirty or forty years. In Contemporary Hispanic Poets, I look at poetry in relation to certain forms of cultural production that might be, for more traditional-minded scholars, a rather far afield from literary studies. For example, I include reference to television productions, web pages and even digital games to look at the status of textuality itself in the late twentieth century. Scholars will soon have to look at other forms of textual production that compete and coexist with book production: for example, mobile phones, smart watches, wearable technology in general. How will our relationship with those forms of technology influence our relationship to literature? Additionally, how are these forms of technology referenced or employed by poets or writers of other forms of literature.

Contemporary Hispanic Poets will be on display at the LASA congress next week.

Visit the Cambria Press Booth #7 for a chance to win this book.

Download this flyer for a 35% discount for you and your library. Offer ends on June 15.

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#LASA2015 Highlight: Author Interview with Jedrek Mularski, author of Music, Politics, and Nationalism in Latin America

#LASA2015 Highlight: Author Interview with Jedrek Mularski, author of Music, Politics, and Nationalism in Latin America LatAm Cambria Press
#LASA2015 Highlight: Author Interview with Jedrek Mularski, author of Music, Politics, and Nationalism in Latin America

The following is an interview with  Jedrek Mularski, author of Music, Politics, and Nationalism In Latin America: Chile During the Cold War Era:

Question: Why did you decide to write Music, Politics, and Nationalism in Latin America?
Jedrek Mularski:
In addition to being a Latin American historian by profession, I have had a strong interest in music since I was very young. This research presented the opportunity for me to draw upon my background in both fields by examining the pivotal events of the Cold War era in Latin America through a musical lens.

Over the past few years, several fascinating new diplomatic and military histories have revealed that Cold War era conflicts in Latin America were multisided contests among various regional actors on the left and right of the political spectrum. However, these recent histories have not explored closely the question of whether this conceptualization of the Cold War era also applied to other areas of society. Seeking to deepen historical understanding of Latin America’s Cold War-era conflicts, I explored the music of the period. In doing so, I found a similarly complex web of local, national, and international actors who competed to shape popular culture and contributed significantly to the polarization of that time.

Question: How does your study relate to Chilean society and folk revival?
Jedrek Mularski:
The story that this book traces has particular significance in Chilean society, where a right-wing military coup overthrew democratically elected, socialist president Salvador Allende in 1973. Moreover, the history of Chilean folk-based music during the Cold War era is deeply intertwined both directly and indirectly with musical trends across and beyond Latin America. Folk revival movements outside of Chile played a significant role in shaping the course of folk revival within Chile. Subsequently, Chilean folk-based musicians played a central role in nurturing and advancing folk revivals both domestically and abroad. For those like myself who are interested in folk revival movements, I wanted to contribute to a broader understanding of folk revivals in Latin America and globally.

Question: What do you hope your readers take away from your book?
Jedrek Mularski:
It is my hope that readers will take away from this book an awareness of the very important histories of folk-based musicians such as Violeta Parra, Víctor Jara, Inti-Illimani, and Los Huasos Quincheros, as well as of the music that these musicians produced. I hope that readers will develop a broader understanding of how these musicians and their songs both reflected and catalyzed larger economic, political, and cultural processes. This book places musical production in the context of wider efforts by both the left and the right to shape popular culture and identity as important components of their political agendas.

At the same time, this book is about more than musicians, songs, and political agendas. It seeks also to answer the question of how the public received particular styles of music and what impact music had on members of the populace. The integration of political history, musical analysis, and oral histories with individuals from diverse segments of Chilean society makes this history of Chilean music unique. I hope that the book will give readers a deeper sense of the excitement and fears that individuals felt during the Cold War era, along with a stronger appreciation for the role that music can play in fostering emotion and shaping political behavior.

Question: Your book dispels certain myths. Please provide an example.
Jedrek Mularski: One of the key contributions of this book is that it provides a vivid analysis of how music can reflect and shape political beliefs, emotions, and behavior. Although excellent historical studies on the relationships between music and politics exist, historians often overlook music as an avenue of political analysis. For example, this book disproves the popular myth that Chilean conservatives “had no culture”; it demonstrates that many conservatives had deep, emotional attachments to a particular style of folk-based music that was central to their sense of identity. I believe that there are many more such histories to be told about music’s role in shaping politics around the world. It is important that such histories be uncovered and analyzed if we are to arrive at a more complete understanding of how popular political behavior functions.

Music, Politics, and Nationalism in Latin America will be on display at the LASA congress next week.

Visit the Cambria Press Booth #7 for a chance to win this book.

Download this flyer for a 35% discount for you and your library. Offer ends on June 15.

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#LASA2015 Highlight: Author Interview with Adrian Taylor Kane, author of Central American Avant-Garde Narrative

#LASA2015 Highlight: Author Interview with Adrian Taylor Kane, author of Central American Avant-Garde Narrative Cambria Press Latin American Studies
#LASA2015 Highlight: Author Interview with Adrian Taylor Kane, author of Central American Avant-Garde Narrative

The following is an interview with Adrian Taylor Kane, author of Central American Avant-Garde Narrative: Literary Innovation and Cultural Change (1926–1936):

Question: Why did you decide to write Central American Avant-Garde Narrative?
Adrian Taylor Kane:
I perceived a gap in knowledge about fiction from this region and era. Until now, scholarship on Latin American avant-garde narrative has largely marginalized works from Central America, despite the presence of several important texts by Central American authors. Similarly, within the field of Central American literary criticism, fiction from the 1920s and 1930s had not yet received the attention that I believe it merits. As I argue in the book, Luis Cardoza y Aragón’s Maelstrom: Films Telescopiados, Max Jiménez’s Unos fantoches and El domador de las pulgas, Flavio Herrera’ El tigre, and Rogelio Sinán’s “A la orilla de las estatuas maduras” and “El sueño de Serafín del Carmen” are valuable contributions to a dynamic period of literary experimentation and cultural change. With regard to Miguel Ángel Asturias’s Leyendas de Guatemala and El Señor Presidente, I wanted to call attention to his use of specific surrealist techniques and trace the use of these strategies back to “La barba provisional,” an earlier, lesser-known text written during the years of his initial contact with surrealism in Paris. Given its importance in the history of Spanish American fiction, I also felt it was important to reclaim his masterpiece El Señor Presidente as a product of the Central American avant-garde.
Question: What do you hope your readers take away from your book?
Adrian Taylor Kane: I hope that readers take away from the book a heightened appreciation for Central America’s literary history, a realization of the ways in which Cardoza y Aragón, Jiménez, Herrera, Sinán, and Asturias altered the trajectory of Central American fiction, and a recognition that Latin American authors were writing fascinating and valuable works several decades before the much touted literary Boom of the 1960s. I also hope readers will recognize the value of these Central American works of fiction as important contributions to the mosaic of Latin American vanguardism, one of the great revolutionary movements in Latin American literature and culture. With regard to the book’s broader implications, I hope that readers will appreciate how literature can be a driver of change in artistic, philosophical, political, and social thought. I would also hope that they take away a renewed awareness of how works of literature are cultural artifacts that are capable of contributing to a more profound understanding of history.

Question: What other research do you believe is needed on this topic?
Adrian Taylor Kane:
There is still a tremendous amount of ground to be covered in developing a thorough history of Central American literature and I am encouraged to see that there is a slow but steady increase in the number of scholars working in the field of Central American literary criticism. With specific regard to scholarship related to the Central American avant-garde, I think that studies that would analyze the connections between avant-garde fiction and Central American modern and postmodern fiction would further reveal what a pivotal moment the 1920s and 1930s were in the history of Central American narrative with respect to revolutionary aesthetics as well as sociopolitical thought.

Central American Avant-Garde Narrative will be on display at the LASA congress next week.

Visit the Cambria Press Booth #7 for a chance to win this book.

Download this flyer for a 35% discount for you and your library. Offer ends on June 15.

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#LASA2015 Highlight: Interview with Currie Thompson, Author of Picturing Argentina

LASA 2015: Author Interview with Currie Thompson, author of Picturing Argentina Cambria Press Latin American
LASA 2015: Author Interview with Currie Thompson, author of Picturing Argentina, an important book for those in Latin American studies and film studies

The following is an interview with Currie Thompson, author of Picturing Argentina: Myths, Movies, and the Peronist Vision:

Question: Why did you decide to write Picturing Argentina: Myths, Movies, and the Peronist Vision?

Currie Thompson: I wanted to investigate three interrelated topics: Argentine cinema, Peronism, and the evolution of social norms reflected in cinema. Argentina is the home of one of the world’s major film traditions. In the 1930s, ‘40s, and ‘50s its films were popular all over the Spanish-speaking world, and in the 1960s Argentine directors such as Torre Nilsson enjoyed international prestige. English-language scholarship about Argentine cinema, however, has concentrated on films made since the 1980s, and we have lacked a book-length study dedicated exclusively to movies from these earlier key years.

Another reason I chose to analyze film from this period was to shed light on the government of Juan Perón, Argentina’s president between 1946 and ’55 and arguably the most significant figure in its history. Perón’s presidency provokes acrimonious debate with some considering him a humanitarian hero and others, a fascist tyrant. He intervened in the nation’s film industry in an unprecedented manner, and it was important to assess the impact of this intervention and to determine the extent to which movies made while he was president shared his worldview.

Finally, as the French scholar Roland Barthes has explained, societies have developed myths that confuse what is habitual with what is natural, and movies reflect this confusion. But social myths change over time. My book assesses these changes in Argentine movies made during the Perón years.

Question: What do you hope your readers take away from your book?

Currie Thompson: This book gives readers an essential overview of early Argentine movies that enables them to recognize the critical role Argentina played in the development of Latin American and world cinema. It clarifies the impact of Perón’s government on the nation’s film industry. By examining the evolution of Argentine film genres in the context of Barthes’s understanding of myth, it demonstrates the relationships linking that country’s motion pictures to prevailing social mindsets and to their evolution in the years preceding Perón and while he was in power.

Question: This book also benefits those in film studies in general. Could you please tell us why?

Currie Thompson: Readers will also gain from this book a better understanding of how film genres developed during these years and the relationship between changes in genre films and prevailing social attitudes concerning proper male and female behavior, the family, ethnic groups, and crime.

Finally, although the book focuses on broad patterns, it also conducts in-depth analyses of key films that will enrich readers’ appreciation of them and of the artistic and intellectual environment that prevailed during these years.

Question: What other research do you believe is needed on this topic?

Currie Thompson: Although I am proud of what my book has accomplished, more work remains to be done. We need, for example, additional in-depth assessments of individual films. We also need to study the careers of key filmmakers such as Leopoldo Torre Nilsson. He is a major figure who on more than one occasion distinguished himself at Cannes and gained international renown but who has, especially with scholars writing in English, passed into obscurity. And he is not an isolated example. Many talented cineastes worked in Argentina during these years—Mario Soffici, Hugo del Carril, Lucas Demare Daniel Tinayre, Carlos Hugo Christensen, to name only a few—and we need studies dedicated to their accomplishments. A particularly intriguing case is that of the mulatto director José Agustín Ferreyra, who was a contemporary of the African American Oscar Micheaux but who, unlike Michaux, was a central figure in his country’s mainline cinema. My book studies several of Ferreyra’s films, but we need an appraisal of his entire career. In sum, there is much to be done, and I look forward to reading the studies of scholars who tackle the topics mentioned.

Picturing Argentina will be on display at the LASA congress next week.

Visit the Cambria Press Booth #7 for a chance to win this book.

Download this flyer for a 35% discount for you and your library. Offer ends on June 15.

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#LatinAmericanStudies #LASA2015 #LatAm

LASA 2015: Latin American Studies Scholars — Celebrando Excelencia en Estudios Latinoamericanos

LASA 2015 Latin American Cambria Press academic publisher
LASA 2015: Visit the Cambria Press booth (#7) to take the LASA pop quiz for a chance to win a free book by one of these professors!

LASA 2015: LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES SCHOLARS MUST VISIT BOOTH #7!

New Book Highlight!
“The Brazilian slave past and its African heritage are emerging in urban and rural areas in various forms led not only by activists but also by scholars engaged with local black communities.” – Ana Lucia Araujo

Ana Lucia Araujo, Professor of History at Howard University, has just published another fascinating book, African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World.

This interdisciplinary study examines visual images, dance, music, oral accounts, museum exhibitions, artifacts, monuments, festivals, and others forms of commemoration to illuminate the social and cultural dynamics that over the last twenty years have propelled—or prevented—the visibility of African heritage (and its Atlantic slave trade legacy) in the South Atlantic region.

Dr. Araujo’s other publications include the highly acclaimed Public Memory of Slavery and Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade. She is also the general editor of the Cambria Studies in Slavery Series; forthcoming books in the series include Transatlantic Memories of Slavery by Anna Scaachi and Elisa Bordin and Slavery, Migrations, and Transformations by Toyin Falola and Danielle Porter Sanchez.

See this new book at the Cambria Press booth (#7) and pick up our LASA 2015 flyer with the 35% discount coupon code.

Take our LASA pop quiz at the booth and you could win a free book of your choice,
such as the ones below. These include the books in the

*Picturing Argentina: Myths, Movies, and the Peronist Vision (Currie K. Thompson)

*Central American Avant-Garde Narrative: Literary Innovation and Cultural Change (1926–1936) (Adrian Taylor Kane)

*Music, Politics, and Nationalism In Latin America: Chile During the Cold War Era (Jedrek Mularski)

*Contemporary Hispanic Poets: Cultural Production in the Global, Digital Age (John Burns)

Contemporary Chicana Literature: (Re)Writing the Maternal Script (Cristina Herrera)

Black Women as Custodians of History: Unsung Rebel (M)Others in African American and Afro-Cuban Women’s Writing (Paula Sanmartín: Cambria Studies in Slavery Series by Ana Lucia Araujo, Howard University)

Performance, Theatre, and Society in Contemporary Nicaragua: Spectacles of Gender, Sexuality, and Marginality (Alberto Guevara; Cambria Contemporary Global Performing Arts Series by John Clum, Duke University)

Special Book Highlight–Recent Outstanding Journal Review!
Transforming the Enemy in Spanish Culture
: The Conquest through the Lens of Textual and Visual Multiplicity (Lauren Beck )
“An exhaustive study … Exploring both textual and visual resources and both archival and mass-produced sources, and with a strong reliance on primary sources, Beck offers an examination both broad and deep. … this work has been extensively researched… replete with several pages of bibliographical and explanatory endnotes and color and black-and-white plates depicting artwork, maps, charts, and other visuals in support of the study, and Beck accessed sources in languages as varied as Spanish, Portuguese, Latin, German, Dutch, Italian, English, and French. … the book is presented in a very nice sturdy hardcover edition, something that is a bit of a rarity in today’s publishing climate. … the appeal of this book should be as broad as its subject matter; it could easily find a home on the bookshelf of the specialist, the student or just the interested reader in Latin American history, European history, comparative cultural studies, religious studies, or art.” – Hispania

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for more LASA updates, including the rising stars of Latin American Studies.

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#LatinAmericanStudies #LASA2015

#Kzoo15: Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms — Our Minds are in the Gutter and The Arabian Nights

#KZoo15 #medieval Cambria Press monograph academic publisher
#KZoo15: Be sure to catch Geoffrey B. Elliott, Andrew B. R. Elliott, and Kris Swank of Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms (edited by Helen Young)!

If you missed Geoffrey B. Elliott’s session this morning at the 50th International Congress on Medieval Studies, you can still catch him on Saturday either at “From Frodo to Fidelma: Medievalisms in Popular Genres” (1:30 p.m.) or at “Martin and More: Genre Medievalisms” (3:30 p.m.) Be sure to get a flyer–it has a coupon code for 35% off–from him for the new book edited by Helen Young, Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms.

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Other contributors who have contributed to this volume who will also be at the congress are Andrew B. R. Elliott and Kris Swank.

“Although there is indeed a preponderance of dirtiness in televisual Middle Ages that is symptomatic of Eco’s shaggy medievalism, its frequency does not necessarily reflect a wholesale shift to adult content but instead represents a fragmentation into increasingly niche—and carefully targeted—audiences; thus, only some of the medieval worlds on offer are shaggy.”

– Andrew B. R. Elliott ,
“Our Minds Are in the Gutter, But Some of Us Are Watching Starz…”,
Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms

Andrew B. R. Elliott will be presenting at the session “Political Medievalisms” on Friday at 3:30 p.m.

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“The fantastical elements in many of the tales—sorcerers, jinni, rukh—make the Arabian Nights a natural source of inspiration for the fantasy genre. They also provide authors with a different environment from the endlessly reworked European feudal setting of so much post-Tolkien fantasy.”

– Kris Swank ,
“The Arabian Nights in 21st-Century Fantasy Fiction and Film,”
Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms

Kris Swank will be presenting at the sessions“From Frodo to Fidelma: Medievalisms in Popular Genres” on Saturday at 1:30 p.m. and “Tolkien as Linguist and Medievalist” on Sunday at 8:30 a.m.

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You can also download the flyer for Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms. This book is in the Cambria Studies in Classicism, Orientalism, and Medievalism book series (General Editor: Nickolas A. Haydock).

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for the announcement of the release of another exciting book–The Middle Ages in Popular Culture!

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#MedievalStudies  #Kzoo15