#MAMO15 Attendees! The Middle Ages in Popular Culture has been spotted in Lincoln, UK!

#MAMO15 #TalesAfterTolkien  Cambria Press Middle Ages Popular Culture medievalist medievalism
#MAMO15! Made it just in time for #TalesAfterTolkien & #postTolkien Scholars!

#TalesAfterTolkien & #postTolkien scholars! What is better than excited authors over a book? Excited authors over two books at #MAMO15!

Be sure to catch Andrew Elliott, Kris Swank, Carol Robinson, and, of course, Helen Young!

Get the flyer for Middle Ages in Popular Culture and Fantasy and Science Fiction Medievalisms and forward it on your library. They can get 35% off for orders placed by July 30.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter, and see the Cambria Press website for more books.

#MedievalStudies #Medievalist #TalesAfterTolkien #postTolkien

Fans of Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones, Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms is now available!

Medievalist Lord of the Rings Game of Thrones Medieval Studies Cambria Press Kalamazoo Medieval
Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones Fans, Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms is now available!

Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms is now available! This fascinating study “illuminate[s] how the manifold layers of meaning attached to medieval in fantasy and science fiction are constructed.”

On The Lord of the Rings

“The Lord of the Rings also fed a powerful American appetite for medievalism that soon manifested itself not only through a new wave of pulp-fiction fantasy but also through the emergence of adult-audience comic books, historical reenactment, and immersive role-playing games.”

However, “Tolkien’s novels constitute the central [medievalist visual narrative] but certainly not the only one. Anglo-Saxon epic and elegiac poetry, Scandinavian sagas, Tolkien’s letters, and Victorian literature and painting, as well as the illustrated versions of Tolkien’s books, are some of the intertexts that find their way into the final result.”

On A Game of Thrones

“Gritty or ‘grimdark’ fantasy claims to be a reaction against what is seen as a romanticized, even bowdlerized, version of the Middle Ages inspired in fantasy by the imitation of Tolkien’s work.’

“George R. R. Martin has fetishized a version of the Middle Ages that he believes is as authentic as possible under the circumstances, and this fetishization leads to the inclusion of problematic elements, such as rape, incest, chattel slavery, and violence against women.”

Download the flyer for Fantasy and Science-Fiction Medievalisms.

Order online by July 30 for a 35% discount – use coupon code Medieval2015.

This book is in the Cambria Studies in Classicism, Orientalism, and Medievalism book series (General Editor: Nickolas A. Haydock).

Catch the editor Helen Young at the The Middle Ages in the Modern World conference at the University of Lincoln (June 29 – July 3) and at the Leeds International Medieval Congress (July 6 – 9!

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for the announcement of the release of another exciting book–The Middle Ages in Popular Culture!

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#MedievalStudies #Medievalist

Cambria Press author Adams Bodomo is the First Black Professor Appointed at the University of Vienna after 650 years

Adams Bodomo  first black professor Africans in China University of Vienna Cambria Press
Adams Bodomo , author of Africans in China, is the very first black professor appointed at the University of Vienna after 650 years.

Cambria Press author Adams Bodomo is not only a pioneer in being the first scholar to publish his unprecedented book-length study on Africans in China–Dr. Bodomo has now broken new ground again as the first black professor appointed at the University of Vienna after 650 years! Read the interview which was conducted with Dr. Adams Bodomo on this landmark appointment.

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Juan Felipe Herrera, the First Mexican American U.S. Poet Laureate – The Contemporary Hispanic Poets Have Arrived!

Juan Felipe Herrera Poet Laureate Contemporary Hispanic Poets: Cultural Production in the Global, Digital Age  Cambria Press LASA
Juan Felipe Herrera Named U.S. Poet Laureate. Photo from http://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/06/10/412909814/juan-felipe-herrera-named-u-s-poet-laureate

The Library of Congress announced yesterday that the next U.S. poet laureate is Juan Felipe Herrera. He is the first Latino poet to be appointed to the position.

This significant achievement comes as no surprise to those familiar with Herrera’s work, especially Professor John Burns, Chair of the  Department of Modern and Classical Languages at Rockford University. In his new book Contemporary Hispanic Poets: Cultural Production in the Global, Digital Age, which was just published this March and launched at the recent Latin American Studies Association (LASA) international congress in Puerto Rico, Burns asserted that “Herrera is not heavy-handed, and when his work treads into the political realm, it embraces the ambiguities that are inherent in political value judgments.”

In discussing Juan Felipe Herrera‘s style, Burns also stated that “Herrera has not produced ‘the effect of the subaltern as subject’ for the sake of cultural legibility. Rather, he has attempted to articulate the space he inhabits, with all its playfulness and indeterminacy, thus avoiding essentialisms, strategic or otherwise. More often than not his work inhabits interstices, a space in between determined positions, and a space from which he can make those apparently determined positions—be they ethnic, political, or cultural—a little blurrier.”

This insightful observation makes it clear why learning more about Juan Felipe Herrera and his work (as well as other contemporary Hispanic poets) is critical not only for those in literary studies but in all disciplines of Latino studies.

Read the author interview with John Burns, author of Contemporary Hispanic Poets, which is in the Cambria Latin American Literatures and Cultures Series, headed by Cambria Latin American Literatures and Cultures Series headed by Román de la Campa, the Edwin B. and Lenore R. Williams Professor of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania.

#LASA2015 Congrats to Our Winners — Roberto Bolaño is the answer!

Latin American Studies #LASA2015 Cambria Press Roberto Bolaño
#LASA 2015 – Congrats to Our Winners! Roberto Bolaño is the correct answer!

Thanks to all who participated in the LASA 2015 pop quiz–we had nearly 100 entries.

The correct answer is Roberto Bolaño!

Congrats to Sol Palaez, Ana Paula Höfling, and Casey Drosehn, who answered correctly and won books of their choice!

If you did not win, you can still get the book you want with the LASA discount.

Orders placed by June 15, using the code LASA15, will have 35% taken off.

Download this flyer for a 35% discount for you and your library. Offer ends on June 15.

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See the Cambria Press website for more books.

#LASA2015 Pop Quiz @CambriaPress Booth #7 – Your Chance to Win A Free Book!

#LASA2015 Cambria Press Latin American Studies LatAm
#LASA2015 Pop Quiz! Submit your answer at the Cambria Press booth (#7) and you could win a free book!

#LASA2015 Pop Quiz! Come to the Cambria Press booth (#7) in the book exhibit hall and submit your answer. You could win a free book of your choice!

Download this flyer for a 35% discount for you and your library. Offer ends on June 15.

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See the Cambria Press website for more books.

#LASA2015 Highlight: Interview with John Burns, author of Contemporary Hispanic Poets

#LASA2015 Highlight: Interview with John Burns, author of Contemporary Hispanic Poets Cambria Press Latin American Studies
#LASA2015 Highlight: Interview with John Burns, author of Contemporary Hispanic Poets

The following is an interview with John Burns, author of Contemporary Hispanic Poets: Cultural Production in the Global, Digital Age:

Question: Why did you decide to write Contemporary Hispanic Poets?
John Burns: I decided to write Contemporary Hispanic Poets because the need to emphasize the relationship between text and context is important when addressing poetry. This is particularly important for English-speaking readers, so as to avoid projecting certain assumptions about Latin American poetry onto texts that may produce meaning in surprisingly distinct ways from English-language contexts. I also hoped to highlight connections between Spanish-speaking literary traditions as well as between poetry and other forms of cultural production, from Internet culture to television and newspapers. Ezra Pound once wrote that “Literature does not exist in a vacuum.” This book attempts to dispel any perception of a vacuum. In order to do so I employed an interdisciplinary approach, using the tools of traditional literary studies as well as critical theory on globalization that focuses largely on political economics, mass media and regional history.

Question: What do you hope your readers take away from your book?
John Burns: I hope that readers appreciate the variety of work being produced in the Spanish-speaking world in numerous contexts and in numerous forms. There is a tendency for readers of poetry, or of literature in general, to exist in metaphorical silos. These may be silos of taste, silos of regional interest or silos of historical periods. I hope to undermine those silos. Although the book focuses on the end of the twentieth century, I situate the work in terms that readers of literature from other time periods can appreciate, highlighting the history that informs more contemporary texts. I move between poets who are highly distinct in terms of national tradition, style and artistic trajectory to illuminate some of their common underpinnings.
I also hope that readers come away with a sense of poetry as a human artifact that can be understood in broader cultural terms. In academia, there is an institutional bias that views poetry as inherently difficult, even as elitist. Rather than elitist, I view poetry as essential. It is embedded in the politics, cultural practices and social norms that inform daily life in different corners of the Spanish-speaking world.

Question: What other research do you believe is needed on this topic?
John Burns: I think there needs to continue to be work that takes into account the massive paradigm shifts the world has undergone in the last thirty or forty years. In Contemporary Hispanic Poets, I look at poetry in relation to certain forms of cultural production that might be, for more traditional-minded scholars, a rather far afield from literary studies. For example, I include reference to television productions, web pages and even digital games to look at the status of textuality itself in the late twentieth century. Scholars will soon have to look at other forms of textual production that compete and coexist with book production: for example, mobile phones, smart watches, wearable technology in general. How will our relationship with those forms of technology influence our relationship to literature? Additionally, how are these forms of technology referenced or employed by poets or writers of other forms of literature.

Contemporary Hispanic Poets will be on display at the LASA congress next week.

Visit the Cambria Press Booth #7 for a chance to win this book.

Download this flyer for a 35% discount for you and your library. Offer ends on June 15.

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

See the Cambria Press website for more books.