First step to #EndTheDivide is #SeekingBipartsanship

#Bipartisanship

“The ideological divide between the parties, enflamed by the sense of partisan superiority claimed by both sides, produced legislative gridlock. There were no winners. We need to get back to an America where Congress solves problems, passes a farm bill, passes an immigration bill, passes tax reform, passes a budget. It is possible. We proved it during Bill Clinton’s administration when a Republican Congress joined a Democratic president to pass three budgets and welfare reform.” – Secretary Ray LaHood and Dr. Frank Mackaman, Seeking Bipartisanship

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AAS 2016 Seattle: Cambria Sinophone World Series Event

Cambria Press will be holding its annual Cambria Sinophone World Series event at the AAS conference on Satuday (April 2, 2016) at 7:30 p.m. in the Jefferson Room (4th floor in the Union Street Tower) at the Sheraton Seattle. All are welcome to this event.

AAS 2016 Asian Studies

Dr. Victor Mair (University of Pennsylvania) will be discussing the series and introducing the new books.

Sinophone

Dr. Mair will speak on behalf of Dr. Wilt Idema (Harvard University) and Dr. Chia-rong Wu (Rhodes College) about their books, The Immortal Maiden Equal to Heaven and Other Precious Scrolls from Western Gansu and Supernatural Sinophone and Beyond respectively.

Wilt Idema author Cambria Press book publication baojuan precious scrolls China SinologistSupernatural Sinophone Taiwan

Dr. Christopher Lupke (Washington State University) will be present to discuss his book, The Sinophone Cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien, which will make its highly anticipated debut at the conference.

Hou Hsiao-hsien

Another long-awaited book that will be released at the conference is Cosmopolitanism in China, 1600-1950 by Minghui Hu and Johan Elverskog. Both will be present to talk about their book.

Cosmopolitanism China

In addition, Dr. Karil Kucera (St. Olaf College) will be there to speak about her book (also being released at the AAS), Ritual and Representation in Chinese Buddhism: Visualizing Enlightenment at Baodingshan from the 12th to 21st Centuries. Her book features 159 color images as well as an innovative online component that takes readers through Baodingshan.

baodingshan

Finally, it is a great honor to have Colonel Thomas Drohan who will discuss his book, A New Strategy for Complex Warfare: Combined Effects in East Asia.

East Asia Warfare Strategy

This is the first book in the new series, Rapid Communications in Conflict and Security (RCCS), headed by general editor Dr. Geoffrey R. H. Burn.

Conflict and Security

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A New Strategy for Complex Warfare

As proactive competitors evolve techniques to circumvent US strengths, it is clear that the profession of arms needs to become a profession of effects. This study by Colonel Thomas Drohan intends to overcome three American weaknesses of strategy making.

A New Strategy for Complex Warfare: Combined Effects in East Asia develops new theory for superior strategy in complex warfare. The approach is comprehensive and practical, and it is applied to three contemporary security crises involving the United States, China, the Koreas, and Japan.

See this new book at The Scholar’s Choice booth at the #ISA2016 conference in Atlanta and at the Cambria Press booth at the AAS 2016 conference in Seattle. This book will also be at the Cambria Press booth at #APSA2016 conference in Philadelphia and at ISSS at the University of Notre Dame.East Asia Warfare Strategy

The following quotes are excerpts from the book.

Why look to East Asia?

“East Asian strategists have adopted holistic approaches to countering threats for over two thousand years. Confrontation and cooperation in China, the Koreas, and Japan coexist as a way of warfare—such as coercion and persuasion. In today’s globalized security environment where weapons of influence are diverse and accessible, strategists need to consider more than precision-guided lethality.”

What can we apply from Sun Zi to modern warfare?

“Ideas from Sun Zi and Carl von Clausewitz continue to be relevant because they deal with human aspects of war, such as deception and uncertainty. … Sun Zi advocated a way of warfare that conserved resources. The pinnacle of generalship, the “army attack plan” (shang bing fa muo 上兵伐謀), was breaking an opponent’s will without fighting. Attacking the enemy’s strategy was best; the next attack priority, alliances; then fielded armies; and walled cities as a last resort. These do not have to be carried out in a sequence; they can be applied simultaneously as multiple lines of effect with variable speed, direction, and duration.”

What sort of tactics can we expect from North Korea?

“Kim Jong-un appears intent on managing external relationships with byeongjin (parallel progress)—nuclear weapons and economic growth. We can expect to see confrontation and cooperation to Defend and Deter threats to the hereditary regime, nuclear status, and, problematically, economic independence. Pyongyang’s cyber attacks on South Korean banks in March 2013, Sony Pictures Entertainment USA in November 2014, and landmine, rocket, and artillery attacks against South Korea in August 2015 reflect the regime’s aggressive-dependent security culture. Attempts to Coerce and Compel main power behavior are likely to continue as a compatible complement to Pyongyang’s combined-effects strategy.”

On inferior allied strategy toward North Korea

“The efforts did Compel limited inspections of North Korean nuclear sites and Persuade Pyongyang to participate in talks with South Korea. However all of this operational-level activity fell rather nicely  within the enabling conditions of Pyongyang’s strategic lines of effect.”

On North Korea’s superior strategy

“Pyongyang repeatedly turned American concessions into baselines for further demands. Creating divisive, therefore negotiable, issues strengthened the power of the nuclear option. […] Focused on Deterring, Coercing and Defending, American tough-talk ignored Dissuading and Inducing as compatible elements of a grand strategy. In Pyongyang, however, arguments for nuclear development, and against inspections and negotiations, fit in as the dispensable Persuasion-Inducement piece of its broader combined effect. […]  Thus, escalation favored Pyongyang’s asymmetric, two-track envelopment strategy, as long as it could intimidate and punish American will to stop the nuclear program… The United States set itself on an incremental path of escalatory options subsumed by Pyongyang’s broader strategy. […]  Pyongyang would engage SK on eventual reunification to Deter the nuclear compliance demanded by the United States, and engage the United States on denuclearization to Deter the independent political-economic role that South Korea sought. Pyongyang basked in Seoul’s Sunshine Policy that assured access to separated families and government ministries, and shaded itself from UN demands of special inspections that assured access to stored fuel rods. […]As American officials sparred over whether to cooperate or whether to confront, North Korea Deterred and Defended the viability of its nuclear weapons development program. Demonstrations of will and capability Coerced allied acquiescence.”

When did China’s Coercive presence in the Paracels begin?

“In 1974 China preempted Vietnamese control of the Paracels by dispatching fishermen to occupy them. The PLA Navy defeated arriving South Vietnamese naval forces, establishing administrative control. Against Hanoi’s claim in the Spratlys, China followed its punitive invasion of Vietnam (1979) with drilling operations contracted through international energy corporations. Through the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), Beijing established a survey outpost in 1987. This drew Vietnamese countersurveys and more naval engagements. The PLA Navy won its Coercive presence.”

How did China and Taiwan strategies interact?

“The broad features of Chinese security culture can help us understand sovereignty issues, particularly in the Taiwan Strait. … To anticipate how China and Taiwan strategies interacted, we examine the logic of the two strategies and then derive key linkages going into the 1995 crisis. Beijing fashioned a dilemma of Persuasion and Deterrence, aggravated by Inducement. China Persuaded unification through assurances of economic benefits, while Deterring independence with intimidating costs. If Taiwan sovereignty leaned toward declaring independence, a demonstration of force sought to Induce the dilemma. Beijing had to sustain this effect to integrate Taiwan into China economically.”

How do China and Taiwan strategies interact now?

“In 2015, a militarily confident China began constructing and militarizing islands in the South China Sea, a new reality with which prospective borrowers can align. Across the Strait, China’s broadened bullying polarized politics in Taiwan again, increasing support for the Democratic Progressive Party now led by Tsai Ing-wen. Like her predecessors who opposed Kuomintang coziness with authoritarian China, she is proindependent democracy and pro-cross-Strait status quo.”

On China’s superior strategy toward Taiwan

“China vied for more advantages than just improving military operations to Coerce Taiwan. China seeks to contain Taiwan through regional control…In contrast, Taiwan military exercises focused narrowly on how better to Defend against PLA operations.”

On China’s domestic problem with waging complex warfare

“The downside for Beijing is that the new tools may threaten as well as strengthen party control in different areas of China. To deal with this, General Secretary and President Xi Jinping consolidated power through reforms that institutionalize national development under party leadership, in populist terms. […] Chinese leaders need to retain popular support of this vision to justify complex warfare against Japan and the United States…four possibilities illustrate how Beijing’s proactive strategy seeks to exploit Tokyo’s separated lines of effect…All of these scenarios could be conducted by distributed cyber operations that inflame flash-mob opposition to Japanese claims.”

What about Japan and its security culture?

“With regard to the military and other tools used to achieve desired effects, Japanese security culture contains significant challenges. Retooling to confront threats has been technically successful, but engagement according to Japanese norms has met external resistance and proven to be unsustainable. Japan’s employment of national power after periods of isolation has not produced success. Yet in the ongoing Senkaku crisis, reintroducing the military tool is regarded domestically as a balanced response to Chinese aggression.”

On Japan’s controversial security options

“In all domains including cyber, preventative effects are unlikely to be credible unless accompanied by causative options. Japan’s sensible alternatives to manage threats include more offensive combined-arms capabilities in the U.S.-Japan alliance, not less. […] The situation demands leaders who can create cooperative effects, or at least restrain the scope of confrontational operations. Someone has to plan for peace. For Japan, enforcing discipline in the face of Chinese baiting is needed to prevent and contain conflict. For China, knowing how far to push territorial claims without provoking sustainable Japanese rearmament is necessary to shape a future that does not include a permanently hostile Japan.”

What can the U.S. learn from East Asian security cultures?

“The three East Asian security cultures and crises featured in this book offer a profound lesson for US policy makers, strategists, and operators: The ability to orchestrate combined effects creates strategic advantages in cooperative-confrontational interactions. This critical will and capability can be used to establish priorities that connect operational missions to national success.”

A New Strategy for Complex Warfare: Combined Effects in East Asia
Thomas A. Drohan
9781604979206  ·  326pp.  ·  Paperback $29.95  ·  Order now from Amazon

Conflict Security
A New Strategy for Complex Warfare is part of the Rapid Communications in Conflict and Security (RCCS) Series (General Editor: Geoffrey R.H. Burn).

 

 

Secretary Ray LaHood’s C-SPAN Interview about his book “Seeking Bipartisanship”

Ray LaHood C-span Seeking Bipartisanship Cambria Press

Former Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood was on C-SPAN for an interview with Peter Slen about his book, Seeking Bipartisanship: My Life in Politics, coauthored with Dr. Frank H. Mackaman of The Dirksen Congressional Center.

The following are a few snippets from the interview:

On the recent article about his book in The New York Times

“the story that Peter Baker wrote in The New York Times was pretty accurate, but the headline didn’t really reflect my feeling about it [… because] “the president tried very, very hard [on bipartisanship] … I cite a number of examples of that in my book.”

On being selected by President Obama for his Cabinet

“I couldn’t have gotten the job with President Obama had I not been a been a Republican because he was looking for a Republican. And our friendship obviously has endured even since I’ve left the job.”

On what President Obama has accomplished in implementing policy

“It is difficult because under our system of legislation passing, it has to come before Congress, which is an equal brancn of government, separate from the Administration, separate from the Executive branch. We’ve seen how difficult it is for President Obama to enact some legislation that he’s wanted to do … but I give the president credit on: he did pass national health care, he did get us out of Iraq, he’s working very hard on a trade bill, he supported this education reform, the transportation bill. So it can be done, but it has to be done in a bipartisan way. No one of the 435 in the House and no one of 100 senators gets their own way. When Congress solves big problems, when they address big issues, they’re almost always solved in a bipartisan way–with compromise.”

On Vice President Joe Biden,

“I developed a great relationship with Vice President Biden. He’s an endearing friend today because of all the time we spent together trying to get people to work on transportation projects.”

On the worst day of his job as Secretary of Transportation

February 12, 2009 “That was the day of the Colgan air crash in Buffalo, New York, when 49 people boarded a plane with the idea that they were going to arrive in Buffalo safely, like thousands of people do today. … As a result of that, we implemented new rules and regulations on pilot rest … and better training for pilots.

On Paul Ryan as Speaker

“I particularly admire him for stepping up into this very important leadership vacuum and filling the vacuum. … I think Paul is going to be a very strong Speaker. In my book, I talk about one of the real pillars of leadership is listening. And I think Paul is and will be a good listener. He’s already doing that.”

On the 2016 election

“It looks like on the Democratic side Hillary will probably get the nomination.”

Watch the entire interview and order Seeking Bipartisanship from Amazon.

Seeking Bipartisanship Ray LaHood Frank Mackaman Cambria Press publication author review

Cambria Press Publication: Seeking Bipartisanship by Ray LaHood with Frank Mackaman

 

White House Correspondent for The New York Times, Peter Baker, Interviews Cambria Press Author Secretary Ray LaHood About His New Book, “Seeking Bipartisanship”

Ray LaHood New York Times Cambria Press author review publication book Bipartisanship

Read the article by Peter Baker, White House Correspondent for The New York Times, in which he interviews Cambria Press author Secretary Ray LaHood about his new book, Seeking Bipartisanship, which he coauthored with Dr. Frank H. Mackaman who heads The Dirksen Congressional Center.

Learn more about Seeking Bipartisanship.

ISBN: 9781604979053 · 360pp. (includes photos) · $29.95 – Buy the book.

Seeking Bipartisanship Ray LaHood Frank Mackaman Cambria Press publication author review

Cambria Press Publication: Seeking Bipartisanship by Ray LaHood with Frank Mackaman

This book is in the Cambria Politics, Institutions, and Public Policy in America (PIPPA) Series headed by Scott A. Frisch and Sean Q. Kelly.

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Lookit! Ray LaHood’s Speech on Seeking Bipartisanship at the Bloomberg Government Book Launch Party

Cambria Press publisher author review book publication reputation

Cambria Press author Secretary Ray LaHood’s reputation for saying “Lookit” was brought up at the book launch party held by Bloomberg Government for Seeking Bipartisanship

At last night’s book launch party held by Bloomberg Government for Secretary Ray LaHood, a Department of Transportation (DOT) alum fondly recalled Secretary LaHood’s trademark “Lookit!”

Indeed, Americans–Republicans and Democrats alike–will do well to look at his new book, Seeking Bipartisanship, which Secretary LaHood coauthored with Dr. Frank H. Mackaman who heads The Dirksen Congressional Center.

The response from the crowd was as enthusiastic as the praise that the book has earned from both Democrats and Republicans. as well as during his other book launches at Bradley University and at WTVP where he was interviewed by PBSNewshour anchor Judy Woodruff.

Tonight he will be giving a speech at the Institute of Politics (IOP) at the University of Chicago where he will be joined by IOP director David Axelrod.

Take a quick look at some interesting quotes and great images from Seeking Bipartisanship.

Seeking Bipartisanship Ray LaHood Frank Mackaman Cambria Press publication author review

This book is in the Cambria Politics, Institutions, and Public Policy in America (PIPPA) Series headed by Scott A. Frisch and Sean Q. Kelly.

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See the Cambria Press website for more books.

Secretary Ray LaHood and IOP Director David Axelrod discuss bipartisanship at the University of Chicago

Cambria Press book author publish Ray LaHood David Axelrod Chicago

Launching his new book, Seeking Bipartisanship (coauthored with Dr. Frank Mackaman who heads The Dirksen Congressional Center), Secretary Ray LaHood will be speaking at the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics on the topic that could not be timelier in American politics–bipartisanship. He will be joined by David Axelrod for this event which will take place this Thursday (November 5) from 6:00 PM to 7:15 PM (CST).

Register now to reserve your spot at this event. Registration is free and open to the public. Signed copies of Secretary LaHood’s books will be available at this event.

You can also order the book from the Cambria Press website.

See also last week’s event when PBS Newshour anchor Judy Woodruff interviewed Secretary LaHood about Seeking Bipartisanhip.

Like Cambria Press on Facebook, subscribe to the Cambria Press Youtube channel, follow Cambria Press on Twitter,
and Google+1Cambria Press .

See the Cambria Press website for more books.