#MLA18 Meet the Author Session: Christopher Lupke

Meet Dr. Christopher Lupke, Professor and Chair of the Department of East Asian Studies, University of Alberta; and author of the highly acclaimed The Sinophone Cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien: Culture, Style, Voice, and Motion; on Friday (January 5) at 11:40 a.m. at the Cambria Press booth (101).

#MLA18

This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania) and the Cambria Global Performing Arts Series headed by John M. Clum (Duke University).

After the publication of his book, Dr. Lupke was invited to join the editorial board of the Cambria Sinophone World Series.

Given his experience as an author and editorial board member, this will be a great opportunity for #MLA18 attendees who have questions about his book and the publishing process (e.g., proposals, peer reviews, publication acceptance, etc.).

Dr. Lupke also sits on the editorial boards of PMLA, asia critique, Journal of Modern Literature in Chinese, CLT: Chinese Literature Today, Rocky Mountain Review, and Pacific Coast Philology.

Dr. Lupke will be participating in the following #MLA18 sessions:

 

 

 

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Cambria Press Publication Review – A New Strategy for Complex Warfare: Combined Effects in East Asia

Congratulations to Brigadier General Thomas Drohan on another outstanding journal review of his book, A New Strategy for Complex Warfare: Combined Effects in East Asia.

Asian Warfare

The Journal of Asian Security and International Affairs commends the book because it “provides comprehensive and insightful analysis over a new strategy in complex warfare that bridges the gap among different theories, military doctrines and practices of strategy formulation.”

The review recommends the book, stating that “A New Strategy for Complex Warfare is helpful for practitioners to frame the situation, think about their desired effects and achieve the synthesis effects after adopting multiple physical and psychological means. Readers seeking an insightful analysis over the complexity of foreign strategies and the interactions among different strategic means are likely to find this book helpful.”

This book is in the Rapid Communications in Conflict and Security (RCCS) Series (General Editor: Geoffrey R.H. Burn).

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#MLA18 Book Launch: The Monster as War Machine

Meet Dr. Mabel Moraña, William H. Gass Professor in Arts and Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and winner of the 2013 MLA Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize, on Saturday (January 6) at 11:30 a.m. at the Cambria Press booth (101) for a book signing for her latest book, The Monster as War Machine.

This book is in the Cambria Latin American Literatures and Cultures Series headed by Dr. Román de la Campa, the Edwin B. and Lenore R. Williams Professor of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr.  de la Campa will also be at the booth to celebrate the publication of this new book.

Read excerpts of The Monster as War Machine.

#MLA18

Professor Moraña will be a speaker at the session “Theoretical Approaches to Colonial Latin American Studies” on Thursday (Jan 4) at 5:15 p.m. in the Lincoln Suite at the Hilton hotel.

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The Monster as War Machine – Book Excerpts

Cambria Press is proud to announce the publication of the new book, The Monster as War Machine, by by Mabel Moraña, William H. Gass Professor in Arts and Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and winner of the 2013 MLA Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize. See below for excerpts from this book, which has been hailed as “a tour de force” and praised for being “audacious, erudite, and exquisitely written.”

Monster as War Machine

From the preface

An apparatus of social immunization, a simulacrum that spectacularizes its artificiality, a shifter that activates social dynamics, an assemblage that threatens the machinery of power, the monster symbolizes the heroic resistance of the slave and the sinister excesses of the master. Thus, it is essential to contextualize, even though it may seem fallacious, even the universality that the monster evokes in every one of its apparitions and attributes. In spite of its extreme empiria, and although it frequently lacks rationality and language, the monster is in its own way always philosophical. This book proceeds as a critical exercise that follows the meanderings of the monster’s “negative aesthetics.”

On Epistemophilia and the Performance of Difference

The nineteenth century was inhabited by ghosts and monsters that expressed dystopian fantasies about the possibility of unrestrained combinations of nature and technology. The anxiety that accompanied the ideology of progress, the turbulent culmination of the colonialist enterprise in the Americas, and the massive expansion of capitalism came to be sublimated through the monstrous. In this context, monstrosity constituted a discourse that directly addressed the tensions and exclusions of the social “order” of modernity in which forms of domination and social exclusion that began with colonialism were perpetuated and made into law. Processes like the scientific “rationalization” of the body were based on the demonization of otherness. These practices took the form of taxonomies of races and individuals that became part of the hierarchical and discriminatory imaginaries of infinite “progress” in modern capitalism. Monstrosity provided a visual and conceptual support for currents of thought that promoted privilege and exclusion based on naturalist criteria and supposedly demonstrable and unimpeachable truths. “Scientific racism” asserted the superiority of the Caucasian race within a highly influential technological structure that legitimated the political, economic, and cultural domination of societies thought to be savage, primitive, or barbarous. Forms of hybridity like mestizaje were interpreted as monstrous processes that promoted impurity and the degeneration of “pure” races.

On the Ubiquitous Quality of Monsters

For the monster, neither progress nor utopia nor purity of class, race, or gender exists, because its being consists of a contaminated material in which human qualities have been definitively or partially displaced, erased, or substituted by spurious, out-of-place characteristics. This ubiquitous quality constitutes the essence of the monster. The remains of its soul reside precisely in this ambiguous, fragile, and unstable condition. Zombies, vampires, pishtacos, chupacabras, demons, phantasms, and other representatives of the broad family tree that shares the characteristics of the monstrous or the supernatural are all beings that benefit from solitude and isolation. However, they also share, within their domains, family resemblances. The monster generates itself—regenerates, degenerates—mechanically, in order to survive as a distinct concentration of irrationality in a world ruled by monstrous but legitimated principles of exclusion and reification.

On the Age of Futilitarianism

Certain social, economic, and political conditions nonetheless seem to be a breeding ground for the proliferation of monstrosity, which is expressed both in concrete fears such as the desperation of being trapped, or the disconcerting awareness of horizons that open up a landscape of disorienting freedom that manifests as a foreign, ghostly place. According to the Comaroffs, we are now in “the Age of Futilitarianism”—that is, an era in which all hope is thought to be vain and all effort is considered futile …

The Monster as War Machine is in the Cambria Latin American Literatures and Cultures Series headed by Román de la Campa, the Edwin B. and Lenore R. Williams Professor of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania.

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New Book “How Trump Governs” Now Available

How Trump Governs: An Assessment and a Prognosis, the latest book by renowned presidential studies scholar Michael A. Genovese is now available.

9781604979886front

Chris Edelson (Director, Politics, Policy, and Law Scholars Program (PPL), American University; and Fellow, Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies) has noted the following about the book:

Chris Edelson, Director, Politics, Policy, and Law Scholars Program (PPL), American University; and Fellow, Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies notes:

“In How Trump Governs, Michael Genovese takes us along for the wild and dangerous ride of Donald Trump’s path to the White House and the early days of his presidency. Genovese offers thoroughly detailed discussion and analysis of the election, transition, and first months in office, explaining how Trump’s character and management style were made clear during the campaign and have, not surprisingly, carried over into his presidency. Genovese explains the unique dangers Trump presents, though this is not a partisan account but rather a thoughtful effort to understand what gave rise to Trump and where things could go from here, including the questions of whether Trump can effectively govern and indeed whether Trump’s presidency can survive the Russia story that seems to grow larger day by day.”

Excerpt from the book:

Governing is hard in the best of circumstances, but in our age of hyperpartisanship, and with limited opportunities, the new president may have but a short time to prove his effectiveness. Given that trust in government has been steadily dropping since the 1970s, (there was a bump up in trust following 9/11; however, it did not last long), the ability of a president to lead amid low levels of trust is markedly limited.  In the early 1960s, roughly 75% Americans said they had a fairly high level of trust in government. By 2016, that number hovered in the 20% mark. How can anyone govern when trust in government is so low?

In trying to assess Donald Trump as a president, we have to put Trump’s presidency into context (his level of political opportunity) and measure how he governs by looking at a series of key early tests:

  • Campaign Management
  • The Selection and Organization of his Governing Team
  • The Transition
  • His Inaugural Address
  • The First 100 Days

From these measures, we can make a preliminary assessment of Trump as he assumes power (did he hit the ground running or stumbling?), determine Trump’s opportunity to lead, as well as make a long-range prediction of the type of president Trump will be.

About the author: Michael A. Genovese is Professor of Political Science, President of World Policy Institute, and the Loyola Chair of Leadership Studies at Loyola Marymount University. He is the author of numerous highly acclaimed books, including The Encyclopedia of the American Presidency, The Power of the American Presidency 1789-2000, The Paradoxes of the American Presidency, and The Trumping of American Politics; coeditor of Corruption and American Politics; and editor of The Quest for Leadership. In addition to many accolades for his scholarship, Dr. Genovese was awarded the prestigious American Political Science Association’s Distinguished Teaching Award for 2017.

 

How Trump Governs is now available for purchase.

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Cambria Press Publication Review: Opening to China

Congratulations to Professor Charlotte Furth on the outstanding review of her book, Opening to China: A Memoir of Normalization, 1981–1982, by China Review International.

Modern Chinese History

The review notes that

For those who saw China at this time, this book is a touching reminder of the tentativeness of the whole affair – how Americans and Chinese alike were desperate to meet and get to know each other – and how difficult that was in reality – as cultural gaps and political realities loomed in the background of every encounter.

It further adds that:

Opening to China tells us also about the life of one of our most important China scholars, and through that life we see the growth and maturation of the field of modern Chinese history in the twentieth century. … this book about her time there informs us about the fraught nature of public diplomacy. …those interested in this key period of relations between the United States and China will find in this book a detailed and evocative picture of the personal side of public diplomacy. At the same time, it is a jolly good read.

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Cambria Press Publication Review: The Sinophone Cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien

Congratulations to Professor Christopher Lupke on the excellent review of his book, The Sinophone Cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien: Culture, Style, Voice, and Motion, by Film International, which praises it for being

a well-informed book straddling between the disciplines of Chinese Studies and Film Studies and is highly relevant to film buffs, sinophiles, film researchers, and students.

The review notes that Lupke’s book:

provides Chinese-speaking readers a cinematic approach to Hou’s well-known and less well-known works and non-Chinese speaking readers a holistic view on Hou’s works and a window into Chinese-language scholarship on Hou. By detaching Hou Hsiao-hsien’s works from the frequently-used framework of European arthouse tradition, the book strives to move away from a Eurocentric view and delves deep into film texts. Plot summary is detailed; historical settings and socio-political undertone are foregrounded.

The review also commends the book because

The ambition of balancing between Chinese Studies and Film Studies and between textual analysis, contextual information, and theoretical discussion is also rather difficult to achieve. Yet the book remains an enjoyable read for lovers of Hou’s films and a comprehensive and informative guide to the sinophone world of Hou Hsiao-hsien; it bridges the scholarship on Hou in English and Chinese and embraces Hou’s oeuvres in its entirety.

This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania) and the Cambria Global Performing Arts Series headed by John M. Clum (Duke University).

Hou Hsiao-hsien

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