Cambria Press Publication Review – The Immortal Maiden Equal to Heaven and Other Precious Scrolls from Western Gansu

Congratulations to Professor Wilt Idema (Harvard University) on the great review of his book, The Immortal Maiden Equal to Heaven” and Other Precious Scrolls from Western Gansu.

Wilt Idema

The Journal of Chinese Religions praises the book, noting that “this addition to a growing body of premodern popular Chinese literature in translation, much of it also by Idema, is something to be celebrated. Books like these provide a welcome source of variety for those of us who regularly teach undergraduates and hope to broaden our students’ understanding of Chinese literature beyond the highlight reel of the Shijing, Tang poetry, and six great novels of the Ming and Qing. … there remains incredible value in making obscure, yet compelling, stories such as these available to non-native Chinese readers.”

This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania).

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

 

 

Advertisements

Cambria Press Publication Review – David Malouf and the Poetic: His Earlier Writings

Congratulations to Dr. Yvonne Smith on the excellent review of her book, David Malouf and the Poetic: His Earlier Writings!

#MLA18

The Australian praises “this carefully researched book, part of a series edited by academic Susan Lever, Smith considers what the idea of a ‘poetic imagination’ might mean, with the aim of offering ‘fresh insights into the nature of [Malouf’s] creativ­ity — its tensions, struggles, and moment­s of breakthrough, as well as its potential boundaries’.”

The review also notes that “Smith is a perceptive reader [and] offers close studies of a number of Malouf’s works including fiction and poetry against ‘the context from which they arose’. … There is a wealth of careful analysis here. … This engaging, accessible study will well serve students and teachers. … meticulously researched.”

This book is in the Cambria Australian Literature book series (Series editor: Susan Lever).

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

 

 

Cambria Press Publication Review – The Borderlands of Asia

Congratulations to Professor Mark Bender (The Ohio State University) on the great review of his book, The Borderlands of Asia: Culture, Place, Poetry. #AAS2018

Mekong Review commends the book because “this is an anthology designed to get the poetry out there in an accessible and engagingly informative format.”

The review notes that The Borderlands of Asia is “also a pragmatic handbook. The introduction lays out a heuristic framework for Bender’s reading of the texts that form the bulk of the book. … A substantial bibliography makes it clear that Bender isn’t just pursuing a line of his own, but rather is crystallising a particular geographical instance — the ‘borderlands’ — of a larger and growing body of academic interest, the role of poetry in its ethnographic and ecological context.”

This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania).

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

 

 

#MLA18 Book Launch: The Monster as War Machine

Meet Dr. Mabel Moraña, William H. Gass Professor in Arts and Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and winner of the 2013 MLA Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize, on Saturday (January 6) at 11:30 a.m. at the Cambria Press booth (101) for a book signing for her latest book, The Monster as War Machine.

This book is in the Cambria Latin American Literatures and Cultures Series headed by Dr. Román de la Campa, the Edwin B. and Lenore R. Williams Professor of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr.  de la Campa will also be at the booth to celebrate the publication of this new book.

Read excerpts of The Monster as War Machine.

#MLA18

Professor Moraña will be a speaker at the session “Theoretical Approaches to Colonial Latin American Studies” on Thursday (Jan 4) at 5:15 p.m. in the Lincoln Suite at the Hilton hotel.

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

The Monster as War Machine – Book Excerpts

Cambria Press is proud to announce the publication of the new book, The Monster as War Machine, by by Mabel Moraña, William H. Gass Professor in Arts and Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis and winner of the 2013 MLA Katherine Singer Kovacs Prize. See below for excerpts from this book, which has been hailed as “a tour de force” and praised for being “audacious, erudite, and exquisitely written.”

Monster as War Machine

From the preface

An apparatus of social immunization, a simulacrum that spectacularizes its artificiality, a shifter that activates social dynamics, an assemblage that threatens the machinery of power, the monster symbolizes the heroic resistance of the slave and the sinister excesses of the master. Thus, it is essential to contextualize, even though it may seem fallacious, even the universality that the monster evokes in every one of its apparitions and attributes. In spite of its extreme empiria, and although it frequently lacks rationality and language, the monster is in its own way always philosophical. This book proceeds as a critical exercise that follows the meanderings of the monster’s “negative aesthetics.”

On Epistemophilia and the Performance of Difference

The nineteenth century was inhabited by ghosts and monsters that expressed dystopian fantasies about the possibility of unrestrained combinations of nature and technology. The anxiety that accompanied the ideology of progress, the turbulent culmination of the colonialist enterprise in the Americas, and the massive expansion of capitalism came to be sublimated through the monstrous. In this context, monstrosity constituted a discourse that directly addressed the tensions and exclusions of the social “order” of modernity in which forms of domination and social exclusion that began with colonialism were perpetuated and made into law. Processes like the scientific “rationalization” of the body were based on the demonization of otherness. These practices took the form of taxonomies of races and individuals that became part of the hierarchical and discriminatory imaginaries of infinite “progress” in modern capitalism. Monstrosity provided a visual and conceptual support for currents of thought that promoted privilege and exclusion based on naturalist criteria and supposedly demonstrable and unimpeachable truths. “Scientific racism” asserted the superiority of the Caucasian race within a highly influential technological structure that legitimated the political, economic, and cultural domination of societies thought to be savage, primitive, or barbarous. Forms of hybridity like mestizaje were interpreted as monstrous processes that promoted impurity and the degeneration of “pure” races.

On the Ubiquitous Quality of Monsters

For the monster, neither progress nor utopia nor purity of class, race, or gender exists, because its being consists of a contaminated material in which human qualities have been definitively or partially displaced, erased, or substituted by spurious, out-of-place characteristics. This ubiquitous quality constitutes the essence of the monster. The remains of its soul reside precisely in this ambiguous, fragile, and unstable condition. Zombies, vampires, pishtacos, chupacabras, demons, phantasms, and other representatives of the broad family tree that shares the characteristics of the monstrous or the supernatural are all beings that benefit from solitude and isolation. However, they also share, within their domains, family resemblances. The monster generates itself—regenerates, degenerates—mechanically, in order to survive as a distinct concentration of irrationality in a world ruled by monstrous but legitimated principles of exclusion and reification.

On the Age of Futilitarianism

Certain social, economic, and political conditions nonetheless seem to be a breeding ground for the proliferation of monstrosity, which is expressed both in concrete fears such as the desperation of being trapped, or the disconcerting awareness of horizons that open up a landscape of disorienting freedom that manifests as a foreign, ghostly place. According to the Comaroffs, we are now in “the Age of Futilitarianism”—that is, an era in which all hope is thought to be vain and all effort is considered futile …

The Monster as War Machine is in the Cambria Latin American Literatures and Cultures Series headed by Román de la Campa, the Edwin B. and Lenore R. Williams Professor of Romance Languages at the University of Pennsylvania.

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

 

 

 

 

Cambria Press Forthcoming Publication on David Malouf

A new book on the celebrated Australian writer David Malouf will be out soon. Winner of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the inaugural Australia-Asia Literary Award, and the Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature, Malouf’s works include novels, poetry, nonfiction, plays, and libretti.

His earlier works provide much insight into Malouf’s development as a writer, and the forthcoming book David Malouf and the Poetic: His Earlier Writings Yvonne Smith uncovers what the terms “poetic”, “poetic imagination” and “inner and outer ways” imply for his development as a writer. Making use of some of his correspondence, diaries, and drafts of work-in-progress, Yvonne Smith takes into fuller account the way his works relate to each other and to the circumstances in which they were written.

Cambria Press Publication David Malouf

Title: David Malouf and the Poetic: His Earlier Writings
Author: Yvonne Smith
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979367
304 pp. | 2017 | Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979367.cfm

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

Cambria Press Publication Review: The Rimbaud of Leeds

Congratulations to Dr Christine Regan on the outstanding review of her book The Rimbaud of Leeds: The Political Character of Tony Harrison’s Poetry by the journal English – Journal of the English Association. The journal review commends the book for being:

Meticulously researched … an unusually astute and impressively well informed guide to the poetry. Even those well versed in Harrison’s work will, I suspect, depart this volume with new insights and new knowledge in hand … In the age of Trump and Brexit, there is a certain pathos to seeing this one time member of the ‘white working class’ prove so inclined to side with postcolonial peoples in their struggles with the architects of the post-war order. … Regan’s work offers many new and valuable insights.

Cambria Press publication review

Title: The Rimbaud of Leeds: The Political Character of Tony Harrison’s Poetry
Author: Christine Regan
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979275
290 pp.  |   2016   |   Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979275.cfm