AAS 2020 Virtual Book Exhibit

Welcome to our AAS 2020 virtual book exhibit! Below are the new titles that would have been released at the AAS conference. These were also featured on the outside back cover of the AAS 2020 conference program. Save 30% on the print edition of all titles if you order directly from the Cambria Press website and use the coupon code AAS2020.

At the AAS conference, we were going to launch the Cambria Book Cloud for going remote. Now this effective teaching and learning solution has become all the more important. With the Cambria Book Cloud, professors can assign pages or chapters from multiple books—or even entire books—from our collection to their students for a low, flat fee for semester-long access. During the semester, students will be able to access multiple books via any web browser; they can read the material on their smart phones, iPads, laptops, desktops. Professors can sign up here for their free trial access.

NEW TITLES

Cambria Sinophone World Series

Letty Chen Front Cover

The Great Leap Backward
Forgetting and Representing the Mao Years
Lingchei Letty Chen

“Letty Chen has done magnificent work in looking into the art and politics of remembering, and re-membering, the Maoist era—its fanatic causes, its violent episodes, and its traumatic consequences. With sources drawn from fictional and biographical narratives, she identifies ideological and affective contestations, and ponders the possibilities of inscribing the immemorial and unthinkable. Both historically engaged and theoretically provocative, Chen’s book is a timely intervention with the prevailing narrative of the Chinese Dream. The Great Leap Backward is a compelling reference for anyone interested in memory studies, Chinese and comparative literature, and cultural and political history.”

—David Der-wei Wang,
Edward C. Henderson Professor of Chinese Literature,
Harvard University

Allen Front Cover

The Chinese Lyric Sequence
Poems, Paintings, Anthologies
Joseph R. Allen

“This book is the first attempt to discuss, in both theoretical and concrete terms, the historical development of an important but decidedly understudied Chinese literary form, the poetic sequence (zushi). The poetic sequence is an important form in the Chinese tradition, as it allows the poet to build a complex argument in poetic form about an issue, an experience, or a phenomenon in life. This book is the first English-language monograph to discuss the poetic sequence in the context of the historical development of this art form as a whole, and the connection made between the poetic sequence and album leaves is thought-provoking. Each chapter contains many inspired and inspiring analyses of individual texts. The writing is lucid and accessible, and the book is a great pleasure to read from beginning to end. This book will be invaluable for both specialists in the field of Chinese literature and general readers who are interested in Chinese poetry and aesthetics; it will be essential reading for scholars and students in classical Chinese literature, cultural history, and art history.”

—Tian Xiaofei, Professor of Chinese Literature, Harvard University

Rethinking Sinosphere Front Cover

Rethinking the Sinosphere
Poetics, Aesthetics, and Identity Formation
by Nanxiu Qian, Richard J. Smith, and
Bowei Zhang, eds.

Rethinking the Sinosphere signifies a landmark in the study of cultural interaction in East Asia in two senses. First, it tells the story that literary Sinitic has served as the platform of personal and historical connections in East Asia. Through several case studies, the book affirms that the Chinese characters are the common dominator of the Sinosphere. Secondly, it is a well-knitted tapestry in which the personal, historical, poetic and aesthetic dimensions of cultural interaction in East Asia interweave with one another. This book is a most important source for anyone interested in East Asian studies.”

—Chun-chieh Huang, Distinguished Chair Professor,
National Taiwan University

Reexamining Sinosphere Front Cover

Reexamining the Sinosphere
Transmissions and Transformations
in East Asia

by Nanxiu Qian, Richard J. Smith, and
Bowei Zhang, eds.

Reexamining the Sinosphere is an excellent and much-needed book that explores the various aspects of the concept of Sinosphere with a wealth of textual examples and on the basis of rich and multifaceted contemporary scholarship. The volume puts together a fine group of essays that discuss issues of cultural transmissions and transformations in East Asia and contribute to our understanding by raising important questions as much as by providing answers. This is a volume that stimulates our rethinking of the Sinosphere and will be essential reading for anyone interested in the historical relations of East Asian countries and how this regional concept may be relevant to the reality of our world today. I highly recommend it.”

—Zhang Longxi,
Chair Professor of Comparative Literature and Translation,
City University of Hong Kong

Peng Front Cover

Metalworking in Bronze Age China
The Lost-Wax Process
Peng Peng

“In pre-imperial China, lost-wax casting was very rarely used. As the identification of the technique has generated lively debates among specialists, some disputing the possibility of its use, a comprehensive investigation of its history is long overdue. For the first time, through the careful investigation of Professor Peng we have with this well-researched book a complete state-of-the-field report on this issue.”

—Alain Thote, Directeur d’études, École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris

Burnett Front Cover

Shaping Chinese Art History
Pang Yuanji and His Painting Collection
Katharine P. Burnett

“This comprehensive and engaging study for the first time brings into focus the full range of activities of the great collector Pang Yuanji, giving us a picture of a crucial figure in the field of Chinese art history. By situating him within a number of relevant frameworks as collector, businessman, and philanthropist, this book helps us better understand the key role which the art of the past played in the making of a modern China.

—Craig Clunas, FBA,
Professor Emeritus of the History of Art, Honorary Fellow of Trinity College, University of Oxford

See the entire list of the Cambria Sinophone World Series, which is headed by Professor Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania).

New in Japan Studies

Traphagan Front Cover

Cosmopolitan Rurality, Depopulation, and Entrepreneurial Ecosystems in 21st-Century Japan
John W. Traphagan

“A very engaging and thoughtful work that will be of great interest to Japan scholars and to any social scientists with a concern for conditions of life in contemporary rural regions in many of the advanced industrial societies. This is a book about entrepreneurship, depopulation, and the nature of the contemporary rural. Each of these is of broad and comparative significance. The Japanese countryside doesn’t look like the countryside of the sentimental imagination; it is a complex hybrid formation, much as we find in Europe and North America, giving the case a wide salience. Depopulation is a shorthand for several related trends of much consequence: population decline, yes, but rapid aging of the population and significant marriage delay, declining births, and solo living. This too is a feature of the rest of the “developed” world, but Japan’s trends are among the most advanced and there is much to learn from a judicious account such as this book. This is an impressive book, which should gain an enthusiastic and appreciative readership.”

—William Kelly,
Professor of Anthropology and Sumitomo Professor of Japanese Studies,
Yale University

Morgan Front Cover

Law and Society in Imperial Japan
Suehiro Izutaro and the Search for Equity
Jason Morgan

“A first-rate scholarly work that is an important contribution to understanding Japan’s legal and wartime history, especially the nature of tenko (ideological conversion during wartime Japan). Not only is this book the first serious study of Suehiro Izutaro in English, but it is also a profound analysis of the the development of law (labor law espcially) in Imperial Japan, and more broadly the impact of Suehiro’s case-study approach on Japanese law today. Built on primary sources in Japanese and other languages, the bibliography is exhaustive and will be valuable in itself as a guide to the field. There is much to learn from this book, including important lessons about the nature of wartime Japanese society and politics.”

— Kevin M. Doak, Professor and Nippon Foundation Endowed Chair;
and Chair, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Georgetown University

NEW! Literature from Taiwan Series

Cambria Press is proud to announce a new series, the Literature from Taiwan Series, in collaboration with the National Museum of Taiwan Literature and National Taiwan Normal University.

Lupke Ye Shitao Front Cover

A History of Taiwan Literature by Ye Shitao
translated by Christopher Lupke

A History of Taiwan Literature by Ye Shitao, an important public intellectual in Taiwan, was published in the crucial watershed year of 1987 when the end of martial law on the island was signaled. This is arguably one of the most important intellectual works of literary history, made even more impressive by Ye’s inclusion of copious notes, including Japanese-language ones. In this translation, Christopher Lupke has painstakingly translated both Ye’s main text and notes, making this valuable resource available to English readers for the first time. Lupke also provides an introduction that contextualizes Ye’s work as well as an epilogue that outlines some of the major historical and literary developments after 1987, along with a brief mention of some of the most important literary figures of Taiwan. In addition to a glossary and index, Lupke offers a select bibliography that lists works that Ye referenced in his own notes as well as some books that Lupke consulted in completing this translation.

Soul of Jade Mountain Front Cover

The Soul of Jade Mountain by Husluman Vava
translated by Terence Russell

Cultural production, including literary work, has been a key element in the Indigenous struggle for decolonization worldwide. In Taiwan, ethnographic novels written in Chinese, such as The Soul of Jade Mountain (Yushan hun) by Bunun writer Husluman Vava (1958–2007), have been an important tool in the process of bringing the circumstances of Indigenous people to the attention of mainstream audiences. The Soul of Jade Mountain won the 2007 Taiwan Literature Award for the best novel, and this is the first English translation of an ethnographic novel by a Taiwan Indigenous writer to be published by a North American publisher, marking an important step in bringing Indigenous Taiwan to international audiences.

Taiwanese Literature Reader Front CoverA Taiwanese Literature Reader
Nikky Lin, ed.

According to Taiwanese intellectual Ye Shitao, the development of Taiwanese literature during Japanese occupation can be divided into three stages: the “nascent period” (1920–1925), followed by the “mature period” (1926–1937), and finally the “war period” (1937–1945). The six stories in this collection are representative works from the mature period and the war period. Each story depicts different hardships and predicaments faced by Taiwan as a colony under Japanese rule, offering insight into how this part of Taiwan’s history continues to impact contemporary Taiwanese society.

See www.cambriapress.com for more titles.

 

Cambria Press Publication Review – Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture

Congratulations to Professor Wendy Larson on the excellent review of her book Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture by the Journal of Asian Studies.

Contemporary Chinese Culture

The review states:

“Wendy Larson’s landmark analysis is definitely not a survey of Zhang Yimou as a praised or vilified Chinese film director who often provokes heated debates and discussions domestically and internationally. Rather, Larson delves into nine of Zhang’s films, either controversial or understudied, to argue strongly that these films ‘center on the significance, potential, and limitations” of the cultural in “postsocialist China’ … her research is sustained by astute textual analysis and invigorated by a deep and comprehensive theoretical knowledge. … While Larson’s study has greatly contributed to the field of cultural studies through its critical analysis of a controversial director’s films, it also opens up conversations about studies on gender, the visual, postsocialism, and globalization. Larson adopts a new approach to the study of contemporary China that extends the significance and contribution of this book to a larger scale. Larson’s wide-ranging theoretical knowledge and the ambitious articulation of the often slippery idea of culture will attract a large academic readership in cultural studies, Chinese studies, film studies, and history. Her detailed, concrete, and brilliant close readings of the nine films also serve as a rich and useful pedagogical resource for a Chinese film course or a Chinese culture course.”

This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania) and the Cambria Global Performing Arts Series headed by John M. Clum (Duke University).

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Cambria Press Publication Review: Zhang Yimou

Congratulations to Professor Wendy Larson on the outstanding review of her book Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture in the journal Modern Chinese Literature and Culture (MCLC)!

#AAS2018

 

The book review notes:

“At 420 pages, Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture is a magnum opus. … Although I have emphasized the themes that run through the book here, each chapter in Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture is autonomous, making it possible to assign individual chapters for classroom use. Larson writes lucidly and persuasively … Taken together, as I hope I have shown, the chapters combine to produce one of the most detailed and sustained analyses of a certain trajectory through much of Zhang’s most powerful work. They make a persuasive case for taking the popular in contemporary Chinese culture seriously, regardless of questions of taste. Larson’s rich and engaging book is a seminal text in Zhang studies. … Larson’s welcome book reminds us that although the field of Chinese cinema studies has grown and diversified, it is perhaps in the realm of popular film that the most work remains to be done. Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture takes a huge step down that road.”

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Cambria Press Publication Review – The Immortal Maiden Equal to Heaven and Other Precious Scrolls from Western Gansu

Congratulations to Professor Wilt Idema (Harvard University) on the great review of his book, The Immortal Maiden Equal to Heaven” and Other Precious Scrolls from Western Gansu.

Wilt Idema

The Journal of Chinese Religions praises the book, noting that “this addition to a growing body of premodern popular Chinese literature in translation, much of it also by Idema, is something to be celebrated. Books like these provide a welcome source of variety for those of us who regularly teach undergraduates and hope to broaden our students’ understanding of Chinese literature beyond the highlight reel of the Shijing, Tang poetry, and six great novels of the Ming and Qing. … there remains incredible value in making obscure, yet compelling, stories such as these available to non-native Chinese readers.”

This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania).

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Cambria Press Publication Review – David Malouf and the Poetic: His Earlier Writings

Congratulations to Dr. Yvonne Smith on the excellent review of her book, David Malouf and the Poetic: His Earlier Writings!

#MLA18

The Australian praises “this carefully researched book, part of a series edited by academic Susan Lever, Smith considers what the idea of a ‘poetic imagination’ might mean, with the aim of offering ‘fresh insights into the nature of [Malouf’s] creativ­ity — its tensions, struggles, and moment­s of breakthrough, as well as its potential boundaries’.”

The review also notes that “Smith is a perceptive reader [and] offers close studies of a number of Malouf’s works including fiction and poetry against ‘the context from which they arose’. … There is a wealth of careful analysis here. … This engaging, accessible study will well serve students and teachers. … meticulously researched.”

This book is in the Cambria Australian Literature book series (Series editor: Susan Lever).

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Cambria Press Publication Review – The Borderlands of Asia

Congratulations to Professor Mark Bender (The Ohio State University) on the great review of his book, The Borderlands of Asia: Culture, Place, Poetry. #AAS2018

Mekong Review commends the book because “this is an anthology designed to get the poetry out there in an accessible and engagingly informative format.”

The review notes that The Borderlands of Asia is “also a pragmatic handbook. The introduction lays out a heuristic framework for Bender’s reading of the texts that form the bulk of the book. … A substantial bibliography makes it clear that Bender isn’t just pursuing a line of his own, but rather is crystallising a particular geographical instance — the ‘borderlands’ — of a larger and growing body of academic interest, the role of poetry in its ethnographic and ecological context.”

This book is in the Cambria Sinophone World Series headed by Victor H. Mair (University of Pennsylvania).

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Cambria Press author I-Hsien Wu (AAS 2017 speech)

Cambria Press author I-Hsien Wu (City University of New York) spoke about her new book Eroticism and Other Literary Conventions in Chinese Literature: Intertextuality in The Story of the Stone at the Cambria Press reception. This book is in the Cambria Press Sinophone World Series headed by Professor Victor Mair (University of Pennsylvania).

Watch Professor I-Hsien Wu’s speech
at the Cambria Press reception

Cambria Press author I-Hsien Wu publication Story of the Stone

Below is a transcript of Professor I-Hsien Wu’s speech:

“Let me begin with a heartfelt thank you to Toni Tan and David Armstrong, and the whole production team at Cambria. Thank you for helping me transform my project into a book. And thank you, Professor Mair. It is my great honor to have my book included in the series. I feel extremely honored and grateful.

And I am so thrilled to be here today, because The Story of the Stone is not only the most celebrated prose fiction in Chinese literature but also my favorite book. I vividly remember reading an abridged version of the novel for young readers when I was in elementary school. And I remember reading the original for the first time when I was eleven — it was such a struggle! I was completely confused by Chapter 1 and gave up!

But now that’s history. Chapter 1 has since become where I turn to all the time, especially the metafictional framework. I am intrigued by the idea that a stone can be a character, a narrator, a jade pendant, and the book itself all at the same time. And I am fascinated by the stone’s famous criticism of historical romance, erotic fiction, and scholar-and-beauty novels. Although it looks like he is drawing a line between his story and these previous works, in fact he only reveals that The Story of the Stone is deeply rooted in these genres and conventions.

This is where the novel openly shows the author’s anxiety of influence and alludes to the nature of intertextuality, and this is also where my book comes in. To me, the novel’s construction of lust is a dialogue with erotic literature; its making of romance is about the use of drama; in the last forty chapters, the novel wrestles with the scholar-and-beauty ideals; and finally, the mythic stone is created to question the convention of storytelling, not only in pre-existing fiction but also in the novel’s many previous lives in manuscript versions and printed editions.

It has been a long journey for me reading and writing about The Story of the Stone. I hope you will all join me by reading my book. Thank you.”

* * * * *

How does The Story of the Stone utilize language and text to make meanings of the human lives it creates? How does The Story of the Stone exist through its relation to previous fiction? To answer these questions, this book argues that the mythic stone’s harsh critiques of historical romance (yeshi), erotic fiction (fengyue bimo), and scholar-and-beauty fiction (caizi jiaren) cannot be taken at face value. Instead, they signify The Stone’s anxiety of influence and allude to the nature of intertextuality. Professor Wu’s book, Eroticism and Other Literary Conventions in Chinese Literature, is thus a must-read for anyone interested in The Story of the Stone, and for readers interested in novel, fiction, drama, and other literary genres and subgenres in Chinese literature.

Title: Eroticism and Other Literary Conventions in Chinese Literature: Intertextuality in The Story of the Stone
Author: I-Hsien Wu
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979770
240 pp.  |   2017   |   Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979770.cfm

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