Haun Saussy Presents Victor Mair with Surprise Festschrift at Cambria Press AAS 2018 Reception

Cambria Press Publication Author Haun Saussy Victor Mair

What took place on the evening of March 24, 2018, in Washington, DC, was one of the most unforgettable events in AAS history, and probably any academic conference.

The evening began with short speeches about new books by Shen Jiawei and Mabel Lee, Albert Welter, Jonathan Stalling, Megan M. Ferry, Christopher Rea, Liu Jianmei (and Mabel Lee), and Carolyn T. Brown.

Then Professor Haun Saussy was asked by Toni Tan, director of Cambria Press, to come up to speak. While Professor Mair was aware that Professor Saussy was working on an edited volume, he had no idea that this was a festschrift being put together in his honor and that it would be unveiled that very night. So when Toni Tan asked Professor Saussy to take the stage, Professor Mair was under the impression that Professor Saussy was coming up just to say a few words about the forthcoming book. Little did he know that he would be presented with the highly anticipated top-secret volume that was the talk of the AAS.

After Professor Saussy gave his speech and presented the festschrift, Texts and Transformations: Essays in Honor of the 75th Birthday of Victor H. Mair, the birthday surprises did not end there. Toni Tan gave a speech about Professor Mair and then announced that a surprise mystery guest had come all the way specially to Washington, DC, to present Professor Mair with his birthday cake and lead the crowd in singing “Happy Birthday” (in Chinese and English). It was a wonderful night celebrating Cambria authors and honoring Professor Victor Mair, a most beloved scholar who has helped so many in and outside the field.

Watch the video of the astonishing and incredibly heartwarming event, including speeches by Haun Saussy and Toni Tan, the surprise mystery guest who wheeled in the huge birthday cake, and finally by Victor Mair (whose reaction was wonderful and priceless)!

More photos of the event will be posted on Facebook and Twitter soon.

Victor Mair

Order your copy of Texts and Transformations: 
Essays in Honor of the 75th Birthday of Victor H. Mair today!

Editor: Haun Saussy
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979565
486 pp.  |   2018   |   Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979565.cfm

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

Advertisements

Cambria Press Author Carolyn T. Brown – Speech at AAS 2018 Reception

Cambria Press author Dr. Carolyn T. Brown, retired Director of the Office of Scholarly Programs and the John W. Kluge Center of the Library of Congress, gave a speech about her book, Reading Lu Xun Through Carl Jung, at the Cambria Press reception at the AAS 2018 conference in Washington, DC.

Watch Dr. Carolyn Brown’s speech and/or read the transcript below.

 

Cambria Press Publication Author Carolyn Brown

“I always seem to do things a little bit differently from other people, so my questions are questions that I’ve asked myself over many years, and they are embedded in my comments.

My first encounter Lu Xun’s short stories occurred during my sophomore year at Cornell University in a survey course in modern Chinese literature in translation. We must have read several of his iconic stories, undoubtedly “A Madman’s Diary” and “The True Story of Ah Q”. One particular story sent me reeling. When I reached the conclusion of “The New Year’s Sacrifice,” my whole being recoiled in a physiological grimace. I knew something had happened to make me almost double over in pain, but I did not know what. No short story I had ever read had ever delivered such a visceral punch before.

In the decades that followed, I asked myself multiple times why I, a black woman from Queens, New York, would have found Lu Xun’s stories so compelling, why I would have returned to them repeatedly through the years, why their importance increased to the point of consuming hours of my attention through the hard times of my life, why during my career as an academic I would write about them, and why in my post-academic career I would still find the need to close the circle and write this book.

My presence in that Cornell classroom was, in the first place, a bit unlikely. When I entered college, I knew virtually nothing about China. I had never met anyone who came from China or who had lived there, as best I can recall; nor had I felt a particular urge to visit China myself, not that I could have because at that time Americans were barred from travel to “Red China” as it was called. But I had received a rigorous high school training in the “history of civilization,” which as it was then taught was the heroic history of the great white men of Western Europe and the United States. My immature intellect knew enough from my family’s history to know that black people were a full part of the American story even though the textbooks omitted that fact. From my mother’s chinoiserie home décor and a few books in our family library, I also knew that “civilization” included China, which had as much (or more) history and culture—art, literature, philosophy, and so forth—as Europe, and the quality was as good or better. Out of revenge for “the lies” I had been taught, once in college I turned to China, being too young and inexperienced to know that all nations lie to some degree about their histories. I wanted truth!

So there I was, studying Chinese history, language, and literature and reading stories by the man who, for much of the twentieth century, was considered modern China’s greatest writer. He was a central figure in the tumultuous decades of that century, both a product of his time and an agent giving it shape. He is still appreciated for his profound insights into the nature of Chinese society, his dedication to ending the suffering of his nation’s populace, his deep moral integrity, and his unrelenting commitment to self-scrutiny. He never relented in his struggle against the forces that stood in the way of a more humane China, even though he despaired of success. Whatever my initial motivation, there I was, sitting in that classroom, deeply moved by these stories from a different time and place. Why?

Lu Xun’s stories stories are clear-eyed critiques of the social norms and conditions of Chinese society that were, in his eyes and those of many of his reform-minded contemporaries, essential causes of China’s insufficient response to the calamities visited upon it by the forced encounter with Western imperial powers. Lu Xun took what was known, familiar, and accepted and exposed it to be cruel and inhumane, and so opened his readers’ eyes to seeing and understanding in new ways. I had felt the impact of that wrenching reversal of perspective without quite knowing what was acting upon me.

In later years, during my own hard times, I probed my own psyche in an attempt to understand unfortunate patterns of my own creation that were shaping my life and causing me considerable suffering. At the same time in my professional life as an academic I was also living with these short stories, searching below their surfaces for patterns that shaped them. As I was rethinking the narrative patterns of my life, I found myself drawn more fully into Lu Xun’s rewriting of the narrative of his contemporary Chinese reality, looking for the internally generated cultural patterns which had been bequeathed by that tradition and which, to his mind, accounted for dysfunctional dimensions of China’s interaction with external forces and events. In interrogating his texts, I found myself searching for embedded structures that were generating these manifestations, a process analogous to the tasks I was performing in my own life. Somewhere along the way, I encountered the work of Carl Jung and over time began to see the connections between his work, Lu Xun’s analyses, and my life’s journey. This book is the result of that process of inquiry and the best answer I can give to my wonderment about the capacity of these short stories to touch me so profoundly.

My thanks to Cambria Press and all the wonderful friends who have helped me over the decades to bring this book to fruition. Thank you.”

* * * * *

About the book

Scholars who study Lu Xun’s modern short stories have usually focused on the content and used the stories to understand Lu Xun the writer or to sheds light on his times; they have attended to the structure only to the degree that it illuminates these concerns. This study executes a reversal, decentering the content and focusing on the structure as a primary means to understand the texts, and it seeks to understand the Lu Xun who presents himself through his work, not Lu Xun the full human being. The structure that emerges from a close reading of the stories does indeed present an implicit therapeutic model. Carl Jung’s theories of the normative human self articulate with some precision Lu Xun’s implicit vision of spiritual cure. Jung, one of three key founders of modern Western psychology, grounded his understanding of the human psyche in personal self-scrutiny and extensive clinical practice, and so his theories offer a validated psychological model for interpreting the textual evidence.

Reading Lu Xun Through Carl Jung thus deploys a new methodology and proposes a new model for interpreting Lu Xun’s two collections of modern short stories. Perhaps more important is that understanding Lu Xun’s psychological model opens new ways of imagining the relevance of his stories to timeless human concerns. Contemporary scholars increasingly ask about Lu Xun’s value now that the overt subjects of his concerns have receded into the past, and they have also looked to understand his role in the context of the international intellectual currents of his time. Although not primarily concerned with the sources of Lu Xun’s creativity, this study does suggest resonances between the structure of his thought as revealed in the stories and that of key nineteenth-century European philosophers and writers. Even while being firmly grounded in his own times, Lu Xun evoked universal themes and archetypes of the human condition. This book will appeal to scholars in Asian studies, comparative literature, and psychology.

Title: Reading Lu Xun Through Carl Jung
Author: Carolyn T. Brown
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979374
312 pp.  |   2018   |   Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979374.cfm

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

Cambria Press Author Megan M. Ferry – Speech at AAS 2018 Reception

Cambria Press author Professor Megan Ferry, Associate Professor of Chinese and Asian Studies and Chair of the Modern Languages and Literatures Department at Union College, gave a speech about her book, Chinese Women Writers and Modern Print Culture, at the Cambria Press reception at the AAS 2018 conference in Washington, DC.

Watch Professor Megan Ferry’s speech and/or read the transcript below.

Cambria Press Publication Author Megan Ferry

“My story about this book begins when I was about twelve years old. I read about land reform and I just saw individual role models that got me excited and I just had to go to China and find out more.

So the first question I’ll give you is how I did get started on writing this book? The books we write represent important stories of our selves. They are life questions that nag us until we are able to bring them to expression. This book took about 20 years to write. I rewrote it at least six times, completely, and the stories were not ready to come out, and I was ready to shelve it just as many times, if not more. And yet, it is a book that is appropriate for this time of the #MeToo movement, the crackdown on the “feminist five” because it evokes a lot of questions about social justice, liberation, and universal human rights, as we certainly saw today at the Mall here in Washington, DC, and the dominant ideologies that construct the filters that determine how we think and feel.

So, my story begins with seeing in the Chinese women writers of the early 20th century as role models who were wanting to effect change in their culture and were also passionate about contributing to China. And as I read about the critics, the friends, and the lovers, I was constantly surprised by them saying they would qualify the women by saying “Oh, but Xiaohong, she wears her hair in pigtails” or “Ding Ling is a little bit short and stocky” and I’m thinking what does that have to do with her being a woman writer. Or they say that women writers only write about love, but when we read we see that there’s much more going on, much more than what meets the eye.

And what I realized is that women writers are qualified not by what they are writing, but the whole system of the publishing industry, which qualifies how we are supposed to read and understand them. So I went to China and was in the archives, looking through the journals for two years and went to interview scholars on Ding Ling. In particular, I encountered male scholars who, when I would ask them about women writers, they would seem to tell me to veer the conversation toward why did their female students look better–had better hair, better dress, better clothes–because they were kept women of many overseas businessmen. So there was some lamentation in there, and perhaps some jealousy. Another male scholar, a prominent male scholar on modern Chinese literature and Ding Ling–when I went to interview him about Ding Ling, he proceeded to show me nude photos of himself and asked me what I thought, to my surprise. What I realized was that these scholars had encountered a Western female scholar coming to asking about women writers, and what I also realized was that this was another story that was ready to be told as well.

So here I was, a young Western female scholar in China, encountering many different things but certainly understanding about the gender-culture encounters that we have through our mediated world.

The second question we ask is why did discussions of Ding Ling lead seamlessly to male scholars’ discussion of their gendered contemporary milieu and sexuality? In this media-driven world, this very heterogeneous society that we live in, is often very narrowly defined by the power of the few who own those media. Being familiar with media and how it operates in the West, I was looking into and seeing what was happening in China. I laid my hands on as many stories as I could find within China, and what I have seen is how deeply entrenched the gender norms are, equally in China as they are here in the U.S., how they are also reiterated in the media and that’s how we also learn how to construct our world and see our world as common sense. So, what I’m looking at is the structures, what we call the paratexts, for constructing how we understand those women writers–not just the pigtails, not just the stories that they write.

I would like to thank Toni Tan tremendously for the many years that she has been supportive as I hemmed and hawed about whether this book should come to print. I would also like to thank Professor Victor Mair for allowing my book to appear in the Cambria Sinophone World Series. It’s an honor. You’ve created an excellent series for Sinological studies, and it’s an honor to be with so many wonderful colleagues. So I thank you very much.”

* * * * *

About the book

The widespread public exposure of modern Chinese women writers in the 1920s and 1930s generated interest in women’s creative output. The publishing field was the chief cultural forum within which other women looking for role models assessed their experiences in modernity. At the same time, however, this forum was limited by parameters that defined the labor of “women writers” (nüzuojia) as largely sentimental, unstructured, politically disengaged or naively subjective and unable to see the “larger picture” of humanity. Therefore, the value of women’s creative output was classified alongside the dominant narrative that conditioned readers’ responses to women’s literary output as evidence of women’s incomplete emancipation. The liberation of the newly styled women occurred in an industry whose power was the basis of the nation’s new cultural construction, yet despite there being exemplary women within the industry, there is no evidence of women as drivers of culture or in sustained cultural leadership roles to the same extent or with the same cultural weight as their male peers.

Women intellectual’s status as cultural producers, as it was codified in print media, has yet to be more fully explored so that we can better understand the relationship between gender ideologies and media. By deconstructing the hidden visual and linguistic signs of modernity’s promise for women’s equality and freedom one can begin to understand why, a century later, contemporary female authors confront obstacles similar to their pre-1949 predecessors. The social category of “women writers” is one among many that lets us examine how media’s visual and linguistic signs of difference express cultural identity norms and codify the modern individual.

Employing media analysis to examine the way paratexts create and reproduce gendered norms, especially through persistent material and discursive mechanisms that framed women authors and their textual production, Chinese Women Writers and Modern Print Culture is the first study to analyze the gendered ideologies of Chinese print media and political culture in a single work. It is thus  an important book for scholars in the fields of Asian studies, media studies, and women and gender studies.

Title: Chinese Women Writers and Modern Print Culture
Author: Megan M. Ferry
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979381
290 pp.  |   2018   |   Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979381.cfm

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

#AAS2018 Program – Cambria Press Back Cover Ad

We are excited for the annual conference of the Association of Asian Studies, taking place in Washington, DC, next week. We have six book launches, and these books and their authors are featured on the outside back cover of the #AAS2018 program. Please come to the Cambria Press booth (109) in the exhibit hall to check these books out.

 

#AAS2018

Like Cambria Press on Facebook and
follow Cambria Press on Twitter to stay posted.

AAS 2017 Toronto: Books and Scholars in Asian Studies to Watch

AAS 2017 Cambria Press Authors

Check out the new books by these Asianists at the Cambria Press booth 109 at the Association for Asian Studies, Inc. (AAS) #AAS2017 conference in Toronto.

Top (left to right): Wilt Idema (Harvard University), Victor Mair (University of Pennsylvania), Wendy Larson (University of Oregon), Mark Bender (The Ohio State University), and Charlotte Furth (University of Southern California).

Bottom (left to right): Zhansui Yu (Nazareth College), Christopher Lupke (University of Alberta), Takayoshi Yamamura (Hokkaido University), I-Hsien Wu (City College of New York), and Philip Seaton (Hokkaido University).

Professor Victor Mair (University of Pennsylvania) will make a special appearance at the Cambria Press booth (109) on Friday (March 17) at 11 a.m. to discuss the Cambria Sinophone World Series and his latest book Buddhist Transformations and Interactions. In addition, six other new books are being launched just in time for the AAS conference. These are:

  • Zhang Yimou by Wendy Larson (University of Oregon)

    “Larson’s book is important for any reader interested in how the political sphere and visual culture redefine each other.” —Yomi Braester, University of Washington; and Coeditor, Journal of Chinese Cinemas

  • The Borderlands of Asia by Mark Bender (The Ohio State University) 

    “When it comes to other books on the market, there is nothing close to this book in terms of quality or range of material. This is a unique and valuable addition to the field of literature and Asian studies.”—Jonathan Stalling, University of Oklahoma; and Editor, Chinese Literature Today

  • Eroticism and Other Literary Conventions in Chinese Literature by I-Hsien Wu (CUNY) 

    “I-Hsien Wu has done brilliant work in teasing out the intertextual threads of The Story of the Stone. In a very astute manner, she examines sources drawn from performing arts and erotic fiction, identifies ideological and affective contestations, and ponders the consequences of the novel as a text in flux.” —David Der-wei Wang, Harvard University

  • Chinese Avant-garde Fiction by Zhansui Yu (Nazareth College) 

    “This thoughtful book offers fresh insights into avant-garde fiction in the early decades of China’s reform. Engaging Chinese and Western traditions, Yu Zhansui argues forcefully that the Chinese avant-garde carries on the probe into the darkness of history in a quest for transcendent truths about human conditions.” —Ban Wang, Stanford University

  • Opening to China by Charlotte Furth (Univerity of Southern California) 

    “Few Americans today have any sense of how far China has come since its opening in the early 1980s. Charlotte Furth was there to see the start of the defrost with the country’s opening and her lively account of her experiences in China then provides a unique and invaluable record. It is useful in these days of rising tensions between China and the U.S. to be reminded of China’s social reality not very long ago.” —Gordon H. Chang, Stanford University

  • Contents Tourism in Japan by Philip Seaton, Takayoshi Yamamura, Akiko Sugawa-Shimada, and Kyungjae Jang

    “This may be the best book ever written on tourism in Japan! This work is on one of the most important subjects in contemporary tourism studies and Japan studies, perhaps a forerunner of things that are also happening in the Korean and Chinese worlds and elsewhere, which makes it doubly important.” —Nelson Graburn, UC Berkeley

Taika square sneak peek

Take a sneak peek at the Cambria Press Asian studies catalog

Taika square book sales

Use coupon code AAS2017 at http://www.cambriapress.com to save 30% on all hardcover titles. Offer ends May 15, 2017.

Taika square book

Forthcoming book in the Cambria Rapid Communications in Conflict and Security Studies (RCCS) Series headed by Dr. Geoffrey R. H. Burn

Taika square BAG

Come to booth 109 to get a complimentary Cambria Sinophone World Series tote bag

Taika Big Banner.jpg

Taika square dessert

Sheraton Toronto Churchill Room

AAS 2016 Cambria Press Sinophone World Series Event

The AAS 2016 conference was one of our best conferences yet. It was great being right in the front of the exhibit hall and across from the AAS booth. We appreciated the compliments on our 8 ft long banners from both attendees and other exhibitors. Thanks to all who stopped by!

Asian Studies 1

Cambria Press AAS 2016 Book Exhibit Hall Banner 1

The Cambria booth had two banners–one for our Cambria Sinophone World Series Event and series, and the other for our latest books.

Asian Studies 2

Cambria Press AAS 2016 Book Exhibit Hall Banner 2

Thanks also to all who attended the Cambria Sinophone World Series Event! Speakers were:

Christopher Lupke Toni Tan Victor Mair Sinophone Asian Studies

Christopher Lupke (Washington State University; author of The Sinophone World Cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien) with Toni Tan (Cambria Press director) and Victor Mair (University of Pennsylvania; general editor of the Cambria Sinophone World Series)

Christopher Lupke Victor Mair Sinophone Asian Studies Toni Tan Cambria

Christopher Lupke (Washington State University; author of The Sinophone World Cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien) with Toni Tan (Cambria Press director), Victor Mair (University of Pennsylvania; general editor of the Cambria Sinophone World Series), and Minghui Hu (University of California Santa Cruz; coeditor, with Johan Elverskog of SMU, of Cosmopolitanism in China, 1600-1950)

 

Victor Mair Sinophone Christopher Lupke Hou Hsiao-hsien Toni Tan Cambria Press

AAS 2016 Victor Mair (University of Pennsylvania; general editor of the Cambria Sinophone World Series), Christopher Lupke (Washington State University; author of The Sinophone Cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien) and Toni Tan (Cambria Press director)

 

Buddhist Baodingshan Karil Kucera

Karil Kucera (St. Olaf College; author of Ritual and Representation in Chinese Buddhism)

Download the Asian Studies catalog and browse our titles. Enjoy 30% off all hardcover titles. Use coupon code ASIA30. Libraries can use this code too.

AAS 2016 Seattle: Cambria Sinophone World Series Event

Cambria Press will be holding its annual Cambria Sinophone World Series event at the AAS conference on Satuday (April 2, 2016) at 7:30 p.m. in the Jefferson Room (4th floor in the Union Street Tower) at the Sheraton Seattle. All are welcome to this event.

AAS 2016 Asian Studies

Dr. Victor Mair (University of Pennsylvania) will be discussing the series and introducing the new books.

Sinophone

Dr. Mair will speak on behalf of Dr. Wilt Idema (Harvard University) and Dr. Chia-rong Wu (Rhodes College) about their books, The Immortal Maiden Equal to Heaven and Other Precious Scrolls from Western Gansu and Supernatural Sinophone and Beyond respectively.

Wilt Idema author Cambria Press book publication baojuan precious scrolls China SinologistSupernatural Sinophone Taiwan

Dr. Christopher Lupke (Washington State University) will be present to discuss his book, The Sinophone Cinema of Hou Hsiao-hsien, which will make its highly anticipated debut at the conference.

Hou Hsiao-hsien

Another long-awaited book that will be released at the conference is Cosmopolitanism in China, 1600-1950 by Minghui Hu and Johan Elverskog. Both will be present to talk about their book.

Cosmopolitanism China

In addition, Dr. Karil Kucera (St. Olaf College) will be there to speak about her book (also being released at the AAS), Ritual and Representation in Chinese Buddhism: Visualizing Enlightenment at Baodingshan from the 12th to 21st Centuries. Her book features 159 color images as well as an innovative online component that takes readers through Baodingshan.

baodingshan

Finally, it is a great honor to have Colonel Thomas Drohan who will discuss his book, A New Strategy for Complex Warfare: Combined Effects in East Asia.

East Asia Warfare Strategy

This is the first book in the new series, Rapid Communications in Conflict and Security (RCCS), headed by general editor Dr. Geoffrey R. H. Burn.

Conflict and Security

Stay posted on more developments by liking us on Facebook
and following us on Twitter.

For more information, please visit www.cambriapress.com