Cambria Press Forthcoming Publication on David Malouf

A new book on the celebrated Australian writer David Malouf will be out soon. Winner of the Neustadt International Prize for Literature, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award, the inaugural Australia-Asia Literary Award, and the Australia Council Award for Lifetime Achievement in Literature, Malouf’s works include novels, poetry, nonfiction, plays, and libretti.

His earlier works provide much insight into Malouf’s development as a writer, and the forthcoming book David Malouf and the Poetic: His Earlier Writings Yvonne Smith uncovers what the terms “poetic”, “poetic imagination” and “inner and outer ways” imply for his development as a writer. Making use of some of his correspondence, diaries, and drafts of work-in-progress, Yvonne Smith takes into fuller account the way his works relate to each other and to the circumstances in which they were written.

Cambria Press Publication David Malouf

Title: David Malouf and the Poetic: His Earlier Writings
Author: Yvonne Smith
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979367
304 pp. | 2017 | Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979367.cfm

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Cambria Press Publication Review: Giving This Country A Memory

Congratulations to to Dr. Anne Brewster, Associate Professor at the University of New South Wales, on another excellent review of her book, Giving this Country a Memory: Contemporary Aboriginal Voices of Australia, in The Journal of the European Association for Studies of Australia.

australian-literature

The review praises the book because it is “a respectful, very accessible and timely overview of Indigenous Australian writing … . Brewster’s adroit and engaged analysis of the novels, short stories, and poetry—the way these can be contextualized and understood within the mainstream pressures exerted upon the Aboriginal communities and the continuing fight for Indigenous sovereignty—never frames or takes over from, but rather adds on to, the Indigenous author’s voice which precedes the analysis. …the collection strikes a fine balance between the distancing effect of a scholarly approach and the respect and engagement owed to the Indigenous community. … Brewster’s well-pitched, necessary and timely initiative stands as an indispensable piece of engaged scholarship from a mainstream speaking position that contributes significantly to what Martin Nakata has called the “cultural interface” (198) between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.”

Read more outstanding reviews for Giving this Country a Memory: Contemporary Aboriginal Voices of Australia.

This book is part of the Cambria Australian Literature Series, headed by Dr. Susan Lever.

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Cambria Press New Publication: The Fiction of Thea Astley

Cambria Press is pleased to announce a new publication The Fiction of Thea Astley by Susan Sheridan.

This book is in the Cambria Australian Literature Series, headed by Dr. Susan Lever.

This book will be launched at the upcoming 2016 Association for the Study of Australian Literature conference hosted by UNSW Canberra at ADFA.

The following are excerpts from the new book.

Thea Astley

From the introduction:
“This oppositional stance—in relation to the Church, and in relation to the nation and the colonialism on which it was founded—fed into Astley’s critique of other social institutions and practices. Her work is driven by a moral revulsion against greed and corruption, against class prejudice and the cruelties practiced on social outsiders, against the racism of colonial dispossession and exploitation of Indigenous people, and against the presumption of male superiority and the physical and psychic violence practiced against women.”

From Chapter 3:
“By the time she published Beachmasters, in 1986, Astley had developed a political perspective on colonialism that allowed her to move beyond disillusionment with human relationships structured by marriage, or human relationship to the divine as structured by the Church, to a critique of the structures themselves. This novel takes colonialism as its subject, rather than assuming its presence, and depicts expatriates and indigenous people inhabiting the same socio-political space, drawing out the complications of hapkas familial and cultural identity. Such a perspective on power structures, as we shall see in later chapters, comes to inform her representation of gender and sexual relations as well as colonial race relations, providing a strong intellectual foundation for her intensely imagined fictions.”

From Chapter 7:
“With Drylands, her final novel, Astley returns to the present day and a setting in a small north Queensland inland town of that name. […]The stories are framed by the narrative of Janet Deakin (a name suggesting she is a descendant of one of Australia’s founding fathers, Alfred Deakin) […] The stories, including Janet’s own, are all tales of violence, of behavior which ranges from the verbal sneers that Janet suffers, through to domestic violence and attempted rape. Another woman is victim not to violence but to domestic servitude to her husband and six sons. In this book, Astley’s feisty feminist barbs at marriage as an institution of male privilege and female slavery recur (‘Is it a boy or a drudge?’ asks Janet’s mother when she is born, 103) but the predominant theme is masculine violence.”

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Interview with Anne Brewster, author of “Giving this Country a Memory: Contemporary Aboriginal Voices of Australia”

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Cambria Press Publication – Giving This Country A Memory: Contemporary Aboriginal Voices of Australia by Anne Brewster is part of the Cambria Australian Literature Series headed by Susan Lever (Australian National University).

Why did you decide to write this book?

Anne Brewster: With my book Giving This Country A Memory, I wanted to introduce readers to a range of Aboriginal writers, some of whom they not have heard about. The book has introductory chapters on seven writers, several of whom are well established and have high profiles, such as Doris Pilkington Garimara, Kim Scott and Melissa Lucashenko. It also represents up and coming writers such as Romaine Moreton, Marie Munkara, Jeanine Leane and Alf Taylor. I wanted to include the voices of the Aboriginal writers talking about themselves and their work, so I decided to interview each of them. In this way they have participated in the evolution of the research I have done on their work. I felt this was very important as I wanted to avoid writing about their work as if they were not present in the discussion. I have learned a great deal from my long conversations with these writers who very generously gave of their time to talk to me and I wanted to share this very important knowledge with other people who may not be luck enough to have the opportunity to talk personally with them.

What do you hope your readers take away from your book?

Anne Brewster: I would like them to take a way a sense of the richness and variety of contemporary Aboriginal literature. Writers like Doris Pilkington Garimara talk about their removal from their families as children and the very slow and painful process of reconnecting with their families and healing. Others like Marie Munkara and Alf Taylor have a strong sense of humour which has enabled them to cope with trauma in their lives. All of these writers celebrate the strength and resilience of Aboriginal culture – its spirituality, its profound knowledges and its sovereignty.

What other research do you believe is needed on this topic?

Anne Brewster: The work of all of these writers, especially the emerging writers, warrants further analysis and discussion. It raises many important issues about Australia’s colonial history and about whiteness, for example, as well as issues relating to Aboriginal people and their culture. Alf Taylor is one of the first Aboriginal people to write about the Spanish Benedictine New Norcia Mission in Western Australia just as Marie Munkara has written in her fiction about the Bathurst Island Mission. The poetry and the interviews with of Romaine Moreton and Jeanine Leane give us insight into the histories of their families as well as the issues facing younger Aboriginal people today.

Join Dr. Anne Brewster and Dr. Larissa Behrendt for the book launch at GleeBooks on Saturday (December 5, 2015)!

Cambria Press Publication: Giving this Country a Memory – Interview Snippet with Doris Pilkington Garimara

Cambria Press Publication Review Author

Doris Pilkington Garimara is one of the featured authors of the Cambria Press publication, Giving This Country A Memory, by Anne Brewster.

 

Interview Snippet from Cambria Press Publication
Giving This Country a Memory (Chapter 7: Doris Pilkington Garimara )

Anne: Have you had feedback from overseas readers?

Doris: Oh, look, they were fabulous, in all those places, about the film; particularly the Native American people. We had stories to exchange, and so on. Although Native American people were taken away, they were taken away as families; we were taken away as children and put in settlements and homes.

Anne: So, do you think that we’ve got anything to learn from how indigenous issues are dealt with in America and Canada?

Doris: Yeah. What we need to learn is to be more politically active. We had our entrance into the political arena with the tent embassy, but it hasn’t gone on too far or too strong now. Nobody is fighting for our rights now.

This is just a snippet from the interview which Dr. Anne Brewster conducted with Doris Pilkington Garimara, who passed away in 2014. The entire interview can be read in the book, along with interviews with the other featured authors: Kim Scott, Romaine Moreton, Jeanine Leane, Melissa Lucashenko, Marie Munkara, and Alf Taylor.

Giving This Country A Memory: Contemporary Aboriginal Voices of Australia by Anne Brewster is part of the Cambria Australian Literature Series, headed by Susan Lever.

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Cambria Press Publication: Giving this Country a Memory – Featured Author: Doris Pilkington Garimara

Cambria Press Publication Author Review

Doris Pilkington Garimara is one of the featured authors in the Cambria Press publication, Giving This Country a Memory, by Anne Brewster

Doris Pilkington Garimara (1937–2014) was from the Martu people of the Western Desert. She published a trilogy, Caprice, A Stockman’s Daughter, Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence, and Under the Wintamarra Tree). Caprice won the Queensland Premier’s Literary Award and the David Unaipon Award. Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence was adapted as a film in 2002, The Rabbit Proof Fence, directed by Philip Noyce. The book has been translated into at least eight languages (Chinese, German, French, Swedish, Korean, Turkish, Japanese, and Dutch), and Pilkington’s Home to Mother has been adapted as a children’s book. Doris Pilkington Garimara was appointed copatron of the Australian Sorry Day’s Committee’s Journey of Healing in 2002. She won the Australia Council Red Ochre Award (2008) and the Order of Australia for services to the arts (2006).

Excerpt from Cambria Press Publication
Giving This Country a Memory (Chapter 7: Doris Pilkington Garimara )

“Pilkington Garimara used memory to convey the truth of an occluded Aboriginal history, a history that had been inaccessible both to her as an indigenous individual and to various local, national, and global publics. She undertakes the project of remediating memory as literature in a quest for both personal and collective healing. She imagines collective healing in numerous contexts—that of indigenous people, particularly indigenous women—but also in a cross-racial context […] She aimed to counter the effects of the “indoctrination” by the state and the church (which she experienced during her periods as an “inmate” in the Moore River Native Settlement and the Roelands Mission) which eradicated much of her own memory and instilled in her a sense of shame, fear, and suspicion of traditional Aboriginal culture and people. She describes her return to her family at the age of forty-five as “traumatic”. The living conditions, the language, traditional cultural practices, and the blackness of people (such as her father) were somewhat horrifying to her; and it took her ten years to “undo this conditioning” and come to accept and embrace these aspects of her family.” (p. 245)

Giving This Country A Memory: Contemporary Aboriginal Voices of Australia by Anne Brewster is part of the Cambria Australian Literature Series, headed by Susan Lever.

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Cambria Press Publication: Giving this Country a Memory – Featured Author: Alf Taylor

Cambria Press Publication Author Review

Alf Taylor is one of the featured authors in the Cambria Press publication, Giving This Country A Memory, by Anne Brewster.

Alf Taylor is a Yuat Nyoongar (who is also of Ngadu heritage). He is a prolific and versatile writer who has won several awards. Taylor has published two books of poetry, Singer Songwriter and Winds, and a collection of short fiction, Long Time Now (which has been translated into Spanish). A member of the Stolen Generations, Taylor has recently completed a book, God, the Devil and Me, based on his life story set in New Norcia Mission.

Excerpt from Cambria Press Publication
Giving This Country a Memory (Chapter 6: Alf Taylor )

“The very difficult issues of poverty and addiction which beset the Nyoongar community represented in these stories are thus framed by the mechanism of humour which affirms the strong presence of intracommunal support. […] Taylor’s fiction, in maintaining ambiguity, restores dignity and social hope. The prime vehicle for hope in the story is the humour mobilized in the service of yarning. The comedy is burlesque, bawdy, farcical. It is sharp and biting but often affectionate.” (p. 211; p. 213)

Giving This Country A Memory: Contemporary Aboriginal Voices of Australia by Anne Brewster is part of the Cambria Australian Literature Series, headed by Susan Lever.

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See the Cambria Press website for more books.