Cambria Press Publication Review: African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World

Congratulations to Professor Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University) on the outstanding review of her book African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World by H-Net Reviews. The book review states:

Cambria Press publication review

Examining systems of oppression, representation, and acculturation, this book offers alternative ways of understanding and privileging African legacies in Brazil. Essentially, this interdisciplinary text challenges systems of racism and calls for the preservation,
presentation, and proliferation of African legacies in Brazil. … this book examines the systematic suppression of black and African-centered arts, bodies, religious practices, cultural norms, and sociopolitical traditions in Brazil. Chartering new perspectives, scholars uncover archival mysteries, museum practices, hidden histories, and places of historic trauma. This collection also reveals communal legacies of resistance and empowerment in the lives and practices of all Brazilian people. Read the rest of the review.

Title: African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World
Authors: Ana Lucia Araujo
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604978926
428 pp.  |   2015   |   Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604978926.cfm

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Cambria Press Publication Review: Transatlantic Memories of Slavery

Congratulations to Professors  Elisa Bordin and Anna Scacchi on the glowing review of their book, Transatlantic Memories of Slavery: Reimagining the Past, Changing the Future, by the European Journal of American Studies.

Scacchi Bordin Book Cover

The following are excerpts from the book review.

“With great courage, sharp intuition and professional dedication they have tackled some of the most controversial issues of historical revision and imaginative projection linked to the slave trade all over the world. While stressing the central role of slavery in the affirmation of Euro-American modern capitalistic society, they give space to the dignity and validity of long time ignored acts of memory produced in different fields by people of African descent. The importance attributed by them to these narratives in both written or visual form, are now shown as a dialogic and no less important counterpart to the over-publicized acts of memory written by representatives of the Euro-American hegemonic platform. Through the analysis of a large sample of writings, fiction and non-fiction, films, photographs, popular culture, the authors, a group of renown scholars and artists, question the legitimacy of the kept records, showing that the problem, as William Styron maintained, is not just how to portray the history of slavery, but how ‘to wrestle with the incomplete project of freedom.’

“What appears particularly relevant in this collection is the methodological approach, a complex, comparative, transnational gaze that rightly pulls down the ideal boundaries of nation and continent, North and South America, Brazil and West Africa, and above all French, Spanish and English Caribbean – where, it should be remembered, the slave trade registers its highest peak – allowing them to shed light on the multiple ways in which difference builds up a privileged path to artistic productions. The mechanics of how slavery affected the intercultural, inter-human, inter-linguistic exchanges between different peoples finds in this broad discussion one of the best possible readings, where the textual and the meta-textual crisscross and contaminate each other; a modern approach that ignores stale categories, narrow paradigms, prefigured evaluations.”

“The fluidity achieved between disciplines, territories, languages, anthropological characterizations is happily harmonized with a captivating style, that accrues the meaning of the research and the pleasure of reading.”

Read the entire review here.

This book is in the Cambria Studies in Slavery book series (general editor: Ana Lucia Araujo).

See this book at the #LASA2016 congress. For a 30% discount, order Transatlantic Memories of Slavery now and use the coupon code LASA2016 at www.cambriapress.com.

You can also buy this book on Amazon and get free shipping.

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#ASALH100: Cambria Author & Slavery Series Editor Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University) at 2 Sessions

Ana Lucia Araujo Historian History Slave Memory Book #ASALH100 Cambria Press

#ASALH100: Cambria Press Author & Slavery Series Editor Ana Lucia Araujo will be at the session “Slavery, Public Memory, and Reparations” on Friday at 7 p.m. (Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, 1, Georgia 10) and at the session “From Slavery to Freedom: Black Women in the Americas” on Saturday at 2 p.m. (Sheraton Atlanta Hotel, 2, Savannah 2, Level 2 Lobby).

Cambria Press Author & Slavery Series Editor Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University) will be at two sessions at the centennial meeting and conference of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History (ASALH).

Cambria Publications by Dr. Araujo (more reviews at http://www.cambriapress.com):

Public Memory of Slavery: Victims and Perpetrators in the South Atlantic

“An important and provocative work. No other study so thoroughly chronicles the fraught and ambiguous history of memorializing slavery in the South Atlantic. Araujo’s ability to ‘read’ multiple sources – both discursive and non-discursive – makes the book truly interdisciplinary in scope. It will be a crucial starting point for all future studies of slavery and memory in Benin and Brazil.” – James H. Sweet, Journal of African History

Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade: Interactions, Identities, and Images

“The scholarly quality of the dozen essays included here is uniformly high … The quality and variety of the contributions make this book a desirable purchase for research libraries, and scholars of the history and culture of slavery and the black Atlantic are well advised to direct their attention to the essays which best match their interests and to consult the extensive and up-to-date bibliography of primary and secondary sources with which Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade closes. Araujo and her contributors deserve praise for putting together this exciting collection, as does Cambria Press for producing it as an attractively designed and well-laid-out volume.” – Journal of Latin American Studies

African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World

“The memory of slavery and the slave trade has strongly influenced how history is understood. What is remembered and why are clearly identified as major historical themes of analysis in this valuable collection.” – Canadian Journal of Latin American and Caribbean Studies

Books in the Cambria Studies in Slavery Series:

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President Abraham Lincoln and Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation on Slavery

Presidential Proclamation Slavery Cambria Press publication review author publisher

Henry Louis Stephens, untitled watercolor ( c. 1863) of a man reading a newspaper with headline “Presidential Proclamation/Slavery”.

One hundred and fifty-three years ago on this day, President Abraham Lincoln had issued a preliminary proclamation warning that he would order the emancipation of all slaves in any state that did not end its rebellion against the Union by January 1, 1863.

Today the history and memory of slavery is an important area of study not only in the United States but all around the world, as scholars like Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University), general editor of the Cambria Studies in Slavery Series, and the following books have shown.

Cambria Press Publication List
in Slave Studies

#BlackHistoryMonth: In Celebration

#BlackHistoryMonth

Many notable African Americans hailed from Memphis, including Veronica Coleman, Tennessee’s first black U.S. Attorney General. In her book Notable Black Memphians, Miriam DeCosta-Willis (a notable African American herself as the first faculty member of Memphis State University) provides a biographical and historical study which traces the evolution of a major Southern city through the lives of black men and women who overcame social and economic barriers to create artistic works, found institutions, and obtain leadership positions that enabled them to shape their community.

Moving to the East Coast, Building a Healthy Black Harlem has been praised by the journal Afro-Americans in New York: Life and History for being “a valuable contribution to our knowledge of a place and time better known for its famous writers and artists than for the quotidian struggles of its workers facing racism and the structural economic trap of high rents and low wages … Wilson’s book is an impressive achievement that updates social history with fresh material and perspectives and makes important interventions in the literature on African American urbanization.”

Black history also makes it mark in the performing arts. Black Medea is an anthology of six adaptations of the Euripidean tragedy by contemporary American playwrights that present Medea as a black Medea. For example, Jim Magnuson’s African Medea sets the play in Angola in the early nineteenth century with Medea as an African princess and Jason as a Portuguese soldier.  Placing six adaptations side by side and interviewing the playwrights in order to gain their insights into their work allows the reader to see how an ancient Greek tragedy has been used by contemporary American artists to frame and understand African American history. This book is in the Cambria Contemporary Global Performing Arts Series headed by John Clum (Duke University).

Black history is to be found in literary works as well. Black Women as Custodians of History sheds much light on black history through the examination of texts by African American and Afro-Cuban women from four different literary genres (autobiographical slave narrative, contemporary novel on slavery, testimonial narrative, and poetry). The book shows that in the womens’ revisions of national history, their writings also demonstrate the pervasive role of racial and gender categories in the creation of a discourse of national identity, while promoting a historiography constructed within flexible borders that need to be negotiated constantly. This book is in the Cambria Studies in Slavery: Past and Present book series headed by Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University).

Dr. Araujo herself has just published another excellent, essential book for Black History Month. African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World is an unprecedented study that makes a very important contribution to the understanding of the place of African heritage and slavery in the official history and public memory of Brazil and Angola. This new must-have book illuminates the history of African tangible and intangible heritages and its links with the public memory of slavery in Brazil and Angola.

Books like these are critical to black studies. Celebrate #BlackHistoryMonth by spreading the word about these important studies and making sure that these books are available at your library (if they are not, let your librarian know). From now until April 20, 2015, there is a 35% discount on all hardbound books–use coupon code CAMBRIA188.

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#Slavery: African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World (Ana Lucia Araujo) now available!

#slavery

#slavery: New Essential Book for scholars in slave studies, world history, Africana studies, and Latin American Studies: African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World (Ana Lucia Araujo)

“Brazil imported the largest number of enslaved Africans during the Atlantic slave trade era […] Today, with the exception of Nigeria, the largest population of people of African descent is in Brazil […] Yet, Brazil has a complex relationship with its slave past; consequently, these complications spill over into the various dimensions of Brazil’s rich African heritage that originated from this tragic period.”
– Ana Lucia Araujo (introduction to African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World)

This unprecedented interdisciplinary volume led by Ana Lucia Araujo (Professor of History at Howard University and general editor of the Cambria Studies in Slavery: Past and Present book series) is now available. African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World is the first book in English to focus on African heritage and public memory of slavery in Brazil and Angola. This interdisciplinary study examines visual images, dance, music, oral accounts, museum exhibitions, artifacts, monuments, festivals, and others forms of commemoration to illuminate the social and cultural dynamics that over the last twenty years have propelled––or prevented––the visibility of African heritage (and its Atlantic slave trade legacy) in the South Atlantic region.

The book makes a very important contribution to the understanding of the place of African heritage and slavery in the official history and public memory of Brazil and Angola, topics that remain understudied. The study’s focus on the South Atlantic world, a zone which is sparsely covered in the scholarly corpus on Atlantic history, will further research on other post-slave societies.

African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World is an important book for African studies and Latin American studies. It is especially valuable for African Diaspora studies, African history, Atlantic history, history of Brazil, history of slavery, and Caribbean history.

See also Public Memory of Slavery, Paths of the Atlantic Slave Trade and Black Women as Custodians of History.

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#slavery, #Brazil, #Africa, #LatinAmerica, #SlaveStudies, #Angola, #AtlanticHistory, #PublicMemory

 

 

#Humanities Scholarship – Important and Growing

Cambria Press humanities

#Humanities Scholarship is Important

An excellent article from Inside Higher Ed regarding scholarship in the humanities, in which William (Bro) Adams, the head of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), said on Thursday that he wants to push humanities scholarship to become more directly connected to helping address the nation’s contemporary problems. There are also encouraging numbers from today’s Inside Higher Ed article showing that from 1987 to 2013 the average annual growth rate for liberal arts or liberal studies degrees at community colleges was 4.3 percent.

To reinforce the importance of the humanities, we highlight three very different books which illuminate the value of humanities scholarship in the present and for the future.

African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World shows how slave legacies shape the identity and culture of a nation

The Works of Arthur Laurents showcases how gender politics and the dynamics of marriage across recent decades were mirrored in the performing arts.

Modern Poetry in China illustrates how turning away from centuries of Chinese literati tradition seemed necessary in the context of a political, social, and cultural reform movement.

Books like these provide critical insights into the layers that make up the different cultures which will inevitably and increasingly converge, clash, and influence one another as the world grapples with nationalism and globalism. Guiding Cambria Press’s commitment to scholarship in humanities are leading scholars such as:

Stay posted on important scholarship in the humanities!

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#humanities #scholarship