Cambria Press Book Highlight: Seeking Bipartisanship

As budget debates continue in Washington, will President Donald Trump’s $1 trillion infrastructure plan be realized or will it fall through? The infrastructure issue is one which President Obama’s administration attempted to address too.

Former Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood was just interviewed on the National Journal about this and he also discussed the problem in his book, Seeking Bipartisanship:

When the new president [Obama] took office, most everyone accepted the need for action on transportation. They knew where the bad roads were. They knew about bad bridges that needed to be fixed. They knew we suffered with outdated transit systems. But we could never figure out a way to pay for the fixes. The administration would not lobby for an increase in the gas tax when it had the votes. Republicans in the House would have blocked the increase once they regained control of the House. The infrastructure bank never gained traction, although it could have supplemented the Highway Trust Fund. We never figured out how to pay for a transportation bill that matched the president’s rhetoric.

Politico has predicted that President Trump’s “hopes for a ‘very bipartisan’ bill are running into the same kinds of political forces that torpedoed the Obamacare repeal.”

Why is bipartisanship so elusive? Secretary LaHood’s book provides a rare inside account of how politics work in Washington. Order Seeking Bipartisanship on Amazon today for this fascinating read into the everyday life of Washington politics.

Ray LaHood

Title: Seeking Bipartisanship: My Life in Politics
Editors: Ray LaHood with Frank H. Mackaman
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979053
360 pp.  |   2015   |  Paperback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979053.cfm

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Cambria Press Publication Review: African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World

Congratulations to Professor Ana Lucia Araujo (Howard University) on the outstanding review of her book African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World by H-Net Reviews. The book review states:

Cambria Press publication review

Examining systems of oppression, representation, and acculturation, this book offers alternative ways of understanding and privileging African legacies in Brazil. Essentially, this interdisciplinary text challenges systems of racism and calls for the preservation,
presentation, and proliferation of African legacies in Brazil. … this book examines the systematic suppression of black and African-centered arts, bodies, religious practices, cultural norms, and sociopolitical traditions in Brazil. Chartering new perspectives, scholars uncover archival mysteries, museum practices, hidden histories, and places of historic trauma. This collection also reveals communal legacies of resistance and empowerment in the lives and practices of all Brazilian people. Read the rest of the review.

Title: African Heritage and Memories of Slavery in Brazil and the South Atlantic World
Authors: Ana Lucia Araujo
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604978926
428 pp.  |   2015   |   Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604978926.cfm

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Interview with Cambria Press author Professor Mark Bender

An interview with Professor Mark Bender (The Ohio State University) about his new book was posted on the MCLC. Professor Bender’s book The Borderlands of Asia: Culture, Place, Poetry was released last month at the 2017 AAS conference in Toronto.

Cambria Press author Mark Bender publication Borderlands of Asia

See also Professor Bender’s speech at the
AAS 2017 Cambria Press reception.

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Publication Excerpts from “Security Forces in African States: Cases and Assessment”

The following are publication excerpts from Security Forces in African States: Cases and Assessment, edited by Paul Shemella and Nicholas Tomb.

Order this book on Amazon today.

Publisher Cambria Press Publication Security Forces in African States

Excerpt from chapter 1, “The Larger Context”

Armed forces can be used to help governments improve human security along the difficult road to prosperity, literacy, political stability, and domestic tranquility. But that is not the primary role of armies and navies. As central as security is to social well-being, good governance is largely an exercise in making distinctions between these two broad types of security, and then applying armed forces, law enforcement, and intelligence resources appropriately (in coordination with the rest of the government). Too often, the military leg of this triad—driven by fearful or misguided politicians—actually serves to diminish human security. Perhaps the most essential element of governing well is making security forces part of the solution rather than part of the problem.”

Excerpt from chapter 2 “Tools for Assessment of Security: Level 1 and Level 2”

The tools offered in this chapter can be used in various ways to evaluate how well a selected African government is governing and developing its security force institutions. Within this set of tools also lie the means to assess how well single security institutions are performing their roles and expected missions.”

[…]

“Although this framework would be useful for Western governments in their efforts to support African government reform, the most significant application would be as a method for African governments to assess themselves.

The case studies that follow will draw on the analytical tools in this chapter to discuss the efforts of those governments to govern and operate their security forces. The cases have been selected to illustrate a diversity of responses to universal security challenges. In addition to examining the unique aspects of particular countries, each case study will address specifically the following set of questions, derived directly from tables 1 through 4:

  • What is the “national brand” of the country as a consequence of the way the government uses its armed forces?
  • What are the most significant threats that must be dealt with by the security sector?
  • What are the roles of the armed forces and law enforcement forces, and how do they complement one another?
  • Into which category of political system does the country fit most accurately? To what degree do security institutions influence the government’s political system?
  • Does the governance and capacity of the security sector contribute to healthy relationships between security forces and society, as well as good governance overall? If not, why not?
  • What are the trends for security sector institutions, and are there measures of effectiveness that can be captured and tracked over time?”

Excerpt from chapter 3, “The Case of the Democratic Republic of Congo”

“The Congo is sometimes described as the heart of Africa, and like any vital organ its condition will have a fundamental impact on the broader body. With a population of 80 million people, an enormous amount of territory, and nine neighboring countries, it is the key to stability in the region. If the culture of corruption and impunity can be replaced with accountability, good governance—and democratically elected civilian control of the armed forces—the DRC could become the breadbasket of Southern Africa that it rightfully should be. If things continue as they are, the ruling elite will use the security forces to enrich themselves at the expense of the citizenry, and risk throwing the entire region into chaos.”

This book is part of the Rapid Communications in Conflict and Security (RCCS) Series (General Editor: Geoffrey R.H. Burn).

Key words

Addis Ababa

Africa Parks

African Party of Independence of Guinea and Cape Verde (PAIGC)

African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM)

Afrobarometer

air force

Al Qaeda

Al Shabaab

al-Bashir, Omar

Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM)

Alstom SA

Amhara

amnesty

Amnesty International

Angola

Ansar Dine

armed forces

army

Asab

authoritarian regime

bad governance

Badme War

Bardo National Museum

Belgium

Ben Ali

Benin

Berlin

Bishoftu

Boko Haram

border violation [border violation, borders violation]

Brazil

budgets

Burkina Faso

Camara, Dadis

Cameroon

capability

capacity

capacity measure [capacity measure, capacity measures]

Carter Center

Carvalho, Ana Larcher

cattle rustling

Center for Civil-Military Relations (CCMR)

Central African Republic (CAR)

Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)

Cheick Modibo Diarra

child labor

child soldiers

China Poly Group

civil society

civil war

civil-military relations

climate change

coast guard

coercive force

Cold War

collapsed states

Collier, Paul

colonial history

combat experience

complementarity

Conakry

Condé, Alpha

Congo Free State

Constitution

constitutional democracy

Conté, Lansana

corruption

Côte d’Ivoire

Counter Terrorism Center (CTC)

counterinsurgency

counterterrorism

coup d’état

cronyism

culture

cyber attacks

Czechoslovakia

Darfur

Déby, Idriss

defender

defense committees

Defense Institute for International Legal Studies (DIILS)

democracy

democratic consolidation

democratic control

Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (DFLR)

democratic transition

democratization

Department of State Dignitary Protection Detail

Derg Regime

Desalegne, Haile Miriam

desertification

desired outcome

diplomacy

Dire Dawa

Doha Centre for Media Freedom

drought

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

drug trafficking

East Africa

Ebola

Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)

Economic Community of West African States Monitoring Group (ECOMOG)

economic development

education

effectiveness

efficiency

elections

elephants

England

environmental pollution

Eritrea

Ethiopia/Eritrea War

Ethiopian National Defense Forces (ENDF)

ethnic conflict

European Union (EU)

extrajudicial killings

extremism

Eyadéma, Gnassingbé [Eyadéma]

failed state

famine

Faure, Gnassingbé,

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)

Federal Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (FEACC)

female

fireman

First Congo War

flooding

food insecurity

Forces Armées de la République Démocratique du Congo (FARDC)

France

Freedom House

Gadhafi, Muammar

Gafat Armament Engineering Complex

gendarmerie

gender

Geneva Center for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces (DCAF)

geography

George W. Bush

Germany

Global Political Agreement

globalization

good governance

governance measure [governance measure, governance measures]

Grand Renaissance Dam

Great Lakes region

Grindle, Merilee

Grunitzky, Nicolas

guardians

Gulf of Guinea

Habré, Hissène

Haile Selassie

Haleb Island

health insecurity

Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) initiative

Hibret Machine Tools

High Council of Student Association Movements (HACAME)

Human Development Index (HDI)

human resources management system

human rights

human rights abuses

human rights groups

Human Rights Report

Hutu

ignorance

Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS)

Independent Policing Oversight Authority (IPOA)

information campaign

infrastructure

institutionalized competitive states

institutionalized noncompetitive states

institutions

insurgency

intelligence

intelligence fusion center

interagency

interagency operations

internal security forces

International Crisis Group (ICG)

invasion

Islam

Islamic Courts

Islamic State

ivory

Jasmine Revolution

jihadist

jihadist terrorism

judicial oversight

judicial review

Kabila, Joseph

Kabila, Laurent

Kabye

Kidal

King Leopold II

Kinshasa

Konaré, Alpha Oumar

Lake Chad

Lake Chad Basin

law enforcement

leadership

legal framework

legislative oversight

Liberia

Libya

locust infestations

Lomé

Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA)

Mai Mai militia

major shortfalls

Malinké

maritime security

mass migration

Mbuji-Mayi

Meles Zenawi Asres

Mengistu Haile Mariam

merit-based promotion

Metals & Engineering Corporation (METEC)

military exclusion zones

Military Function High Council

military manufacturing

military operations

Military Section Committees

militias

minimally institutionalized states

Ministry of Defense and Veteran Affairs

Ministry of Internal Security

Ministry of Security and Civil Protection

Mobutu Sese Seko

Modibo Kéïta

money laundering

Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND)

Movement for the Unity and Jihad in West Africa (MUJAO)

Mozambique

Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA)

Mungiki

munitions factory

N’Diaye, Boubacar

narco trafficking

National Assembly

national brand

National Conference in Lomé

National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC)

national defense

National Defense and Security Policy

national economy

national guard

National Independent Elections Commission

National Intelligence Agency (ANR)

National Intelligence and Security Service (NISS)

National Intelligence Service (NIS)

National Police Service Commission (NPSC)

National Security Council (NSC)

natural disaster

navy

Nazareth Canvas and Garment Factory

nepotism

Niger

Niger Delta

North Korea

Nye, Joseph

Olympio, Sylvanus

opposition leaders

Optimal Protection Services

organized crime

Oromia

Ouagadougou Accord

Oxfam International

peace-building

peacekeeper

peacekeeping

personal rule

Plato

Police Nationale Congolaise (PNC)

policemen

political opposition

political partisanship [partisanship]

political violence

polling

Portugal

poverty

power

Power, Samantha

President Guard Battalion

Prime Minister

private security companies

Private Security Regulatory Authority

Processing and Research Center

public disorder [“manifested in multiple categories”]

public goods

public health

public safety

Radisson Blu

rape

Rapid Response Units

rebels

reciprocity

refugees

Regional Police Commissions

Republican Guard

resource trap

resources

Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC)

risk

rule of law

Rwanda

Sahel

Samora

Sanogo, Amadou Haya

Schumpeter

Second Congo War

Secret Service

sectarian violence

security

Security Advisory Services

security companies

security sector reform (SSR)

Senegal

sex workers

sexual trafficking

sexual-based violence

Shell Oil

Sierra Leone

smuggling

Somalia

Sousse

Soviet Union

special forces

Special Forces Battalion

Spire Corp.

strategic vision

Sudan

tactical air control patrols

terrorism

terrorist attacks

Third Wave

391st Commando Battalion

Timbuktu

torture

Touré, Ahmed Sékou

Touré, Amadou Toumani

tourism

trafficking

training

Transitional National Government of Somalia (TNG)

transparency

Transparency International

Transportation Security Administration (TSA)

Traoré, Dioncounda

Traoré, Moussa

tribalism

troublemaker

trust

Tuareg

Uganda

UN Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNIOGBIS)

UN Organization for Stabilization in DR Congo (MONUSCO)

UN Security Council (UNSC)

Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ)

Union of Islamic Courts (UIC)

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

United Nations

United Nations Joint Human Rights Office (UNJHRO)

United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA)

United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC)

United States Naval Postgraduate School (NPS)

University of Addis Ababa

University of Kara

US

US Department of State

US Special Forces

Usalama Reform Forum

vulnerability

warfighter

Warsaw Pact

Waterproof Shield

West Africa

West Virginia

Westgate Mall

white paper

wildlife poaching

World Bank

World Health Organization (WHO)

World War II

Yar’Adua, Umaru

Zaire

Zimbabwe

Title: Security Forces in African States: Cases and Assessment
Authors: Paul Shemella and Nicholas Tomb, eds.
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979817
294 pp.  |   2017   |   Paperback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979817.cfm

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Cambria Press Publication Excerpt from “North Korea Demystified”

Cambria Press publication

Given the recent events, it would be timely to revisit North Korea Demystified. The book was published in at the end of 2012, but the advice of expert Professor Bruce Cumings in his chapter “North Korea––Dealing with Irrationality” still resonates with most, especially given the precarious state of world politics and the reputation of the leaders in place. Professor Cumings urges that we “finally to shed the anachronistic polarized positions and mindset of the Cold War and to move in the direction of a calm, steady, nuanced, and persistent process of rapprochement with Pyongyang.” He explains why in the publication excerpt below:

How do psychiatrists deal with an angry, violent, insulting, aggravating, recalcitrant, prideful, self-defeating patient? With concern, empathy, understanding, deflection, subtle advice (usually suggesting alternative behavior), the setting of limits on the one hand and the opening of avenues toward change on the other. Think of Tony Soprano and Jennifer Melfi: did she call him a fat, slovenly, self-indulgent, and self-regarding Mafia thug? No, she treated him like a human being in pain who needed help. China has long used a concept, zixiao, which is usually translated “cherishing friends from afar” (or “cherishing the lesser”), but it really means not sweating the small stuff when it comes to relations with allied or tributary states, or enemies who are not really threatening. It is a classic hegemonic device to show that the power that everyone recognizes as superior nonetheless shows concern and regard for the smaller or lesser party. English does not have a good equivalent to this (although magnanimity comes close), so its speakers use foreign phrases, like noblesse oblige.

North Korea
North Korea Demystified (Cambria Press, 2012)

Buy this book from Cambria Press today and use coupon code AAS2017 to save 30% on the hardcover version.

See also A New Strategy for Complex Warfare: Combined Effects in East Asia by Thomas A. Drohan

Asia Warfare

Cambria Press author Wendy Larson (AAS 2017 speech)

Cambria Press author Wendy Larson (University of Oregon) spoke about her new book Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture at the Cambria Press reception. This book is in the Cambria Press Sinophone World Series headed by Professor Victor Mair (University of Pennsylvania) and the Cambria Press Contemporary Global Performing Arts Series headed by Professor John Clum (Duke University).

Watch Professor Wendy Larson’s speech
at the Cambria Press reception

Cambria Press author Wendy Larson publication Zhang Yimou

Below is a transcript of Professor Wendy Larson’s speech:

“I have been working on this book for ten years. When I first thinking about writing on Zhang Yimou, it was because of the film Hero. As you probably know, the film was extremely controversial. It came out and was widely criticized as being an apology for an authoritarian government as well as many other bad things. As I watched the film, I felt that it was more complicated than that, and I thought that wasn’t quite fair. So that got me into thinking about Zhang Yimou. I had done a little writing on him in the past. So I wrote an article about Hero with a different kind of argument and got a bit of a reaction–Nick Kaldis wrote a response–and I wrote a counter-response. But my idea at the time was to look at the way in which literature and film theorized the position of culture in China–not Chinese culture; that is not to say Chinese culture versus Western culture, or something like that, but rather how culture is structurally working at a time of transformation and crisis in China when there is a lot of pressures from globalization, from consumerism and capitalism, and there’s just rapid change in the information society going on. So, originally, at first I thought I would put Zhang Yimou in there as one person that I will look at. And then I thought I was so tired from doing the book before that, where I looked at so many filmmakers and authors. So I thought maybe I’ll just focus on one, and that will make it easier. [Hahaha] So I did focus on one, but it didn’t make it easier. The choice wasn’t that easy, but I looked at Zhang Yimou’s films and I felt that about half of them, maybe three-quarters of them, could work within my argument. So what I did really is not an auteur-type of study; it is not a study of Zhang Yimou that is going to give you his whole history, his biographical information, his every single film–it is not a survey. It’s really an argument about the way that the films are in themselves a kind of investigation into the way culture is working in China.

There are two questions I often get, so I’ll answer them now. Number 1: Have you met Zhang Yimou? The answer is no. I have not met Zhang Yimou, and that’s on purpose because I feel compromised when I personally know the subjects of my study and I think it is an unconscious thing that I slightly back away from perhaps some of the things I want to say. And that may just be me; it’s not every single person that falls into that kind of trap.

And the second question is: Do you like all of Zhang Yimou’s films? The answer is no. But I like enough of his films, which I think are interesting and I think sometimes they have gotten a bad rap. I’ve had many arguments about this, and that has of course brought out the contrarian in me, and I’m happy to argue about what the films are doing.

So, finally, I just want to say that I am really to be pleased to be able to publish with an independent academic press, and I want to thank Toni Tan and Victor Mair and everyone else who has worked who has worked on this. A lot of people worked very hard on this. I’m very impressed with the speed and quality of the work, and I’m really happy to have published with Cambria Press. Thank you.”

* * * * *

Zhang Yimou has the reputation for being one of the most famous filmmakers of China, as well as one of the most controversial. Despite his stature among Chinese film directors, Zhang Yimou has not yet been the subject of a book-length treatment in English. Film professors who teach his films only have access to a relatively small corpus of articles and book chapters published over some twenty-five years. This book is the first attempt to remedy that situation by laying out not simply a biographical or empirical study, but a polemical argument that counters some of the critical trends in the interpretation of Zhang’s films. In this first critical study of films by Zhang Yimou in English, Wendy Larson plumbs the larger field of debate to suggest thought-provoking ways of thinking about the films and their relationship to Chinese culture. This is an important book for film scholars and for scholars of Chinese culture and history.

Title: Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture
Author: Wendy Larson
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979756
440 pp.  |   2017   |   Hardback & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979756.cfm

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Cambria Press author Charlotte Furth (AAS 2017 speech)

Cambria Press author Charlotte Furth (University of Southern California) spoke about her new book Opening to China: A Memoir of Normalization, 1981–1982 at the Cambria Press  reception.

Watch Professor Charlotte Furth’s speech
at the Cambria Press reception

Cambria Press author Charlotte Furth publication Opening to China

Below is a transcript of Professor Charlotte Furth’s speech:

“Many of you here may not even remember what it was like to study China during the Cold War, when we could not go there.  But I began my teaching career in the mid-1960s, at its height.  PRC was hidden behind the Bamboo Curtain.  Taiwan and Hong Kong didn’t really count… You then can imagine  how we responded to Nixon’s visit to China in 1972.  Thrilled!  The decade that followed was one of  very tentative rapprochement and  limited travel, via delegations approved by PRC authorities.  Think  “socialist tourism”  two week guided tours, itineraries chosen by our hosts. .   Nonetheless, we all schemed to get a place on a delegation—and then we wondered what on earth we had seen (1970s were  the height of the cultural revolution as it turned out).

Then in 1979  President Carter negotiated full diplomatic relations.  Among the changes: a full  American diplomatic mission in Beijing, some Western journalists could be posted there, a few big banks set up shop, and the Fulbright program  of  international exchange of scholars and  teachers, suspended since 1950, was resumed.

And I wangled a year in Beijing as a Fulbright teacher.  Why and how the Chinese authorities choose a historian of China to teach young Chinese scholars about America is a curious story. The details are in the memoir, but it is one of many that show how uncertain PCR leaders were  about the new relationship between  us Americans and the Chinese—and also about the future direction of their own country.  My students weren’t ordinary university students: they were mostly young and a few middle-aged scholars— products of education in Mao’s China.  All one way or another had assignments to teach college-level English.  They came to Beijing from all over the nation.  Of course they were woefully unprepared: torn between curiosity about the outside world and anxiety about their own futures.  But their lives were an amazing window into the revolutions history.

So the memoir is the story of our mutual encounter.  I’d left my husband and daughter to embark on this adventure alone—and I wrote in detail about daily life in letters home—so  much detail that my husband complained that I didn’t seem to miss him. It was true…I knew the letters would be a record of an unusual experience..and I also knew when I came home in 1982 that I wasn’t ready to write about it all.  Thirty five years later, you have it. I am glad I  lived long enough to do this!”

* * * * *

Based on Professor Furth’s detailed notes and letters home at the time, this book evokes the unique atmosphere of expectation and frustration that characterized the first years of normalization. This book is a valuable account for specialists on Sino-American relations and on the formative years of the generation of Chinese who lead the People’s Republic of China today. It is also a fascinating read for anyone who wants to explore the pleasures and perils of Chinese and American struggles to understand one another.

Title: Opening to China: A Memoir of Normalization, 1981–1982
Author: Charlotte Furth
Publisher: Cambria Press
ISBN: 9781604979848
158 pp.  |   2017   |   Paper & E-book
Book Webpage: http://www.cambriapress.com/books/9781604979848.cfm

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